Author: boyd-van-dijk

What We’re Reading This Week

The raising of an Indonesian flag alongside a United Nations flag in West Papua (1962).

LOTTE HOUWINK TEN CATE

Sarah Jaffe, “The Factory in the Family,” The Nation.

Peter Slezkine, “What Happened to the ‘Free World’,” The New Republic.

Sarah Stoller, “Forging a Politics of Care,” History Workshop.

ADEN KNAAP

Karuna Mantena, “Getting the NIEO Right,” Law and Political Economy Blog.

Terence Renaud, “The Socialist Minimum,” H-Diplo.

Thomas Maddux and Diane Labrosse, “Roundtable Review of Benjamin Allen Coates, Legalist Empire,” H-Diplo.

TIGER ZHIFU LI

Kevin Rudd, “How Xi Jinping Views the World,” Foreign Affairs.

“Q&A with Melanie Oppenheimer,” Australian Historical Association.

Simon Draper, “Selling NZ to India,” Stuff.

Emma Kluge, “Women and Decolonization Event,” History Matters Blog.

What We’re Reading This Week

When it was first displayed in Madrid in 1981, Picasso’s painting “Guernica” was protected by armed guards/Associated Press.

CAROLINE KAHLENBERG

Ann Snitow, ‘Talking Back to the Patriarchy,’ Dissent.

Alan Taylor, ‘100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War I,’ The Atlantic.

Peter Hessler, ‘Cairo: A Type of Love Story,’ The New Yorker.

Sophie Pinkham, ‘No Direction Home,’ The New Republic.

CHRIS SZABLA

Alex von Tunzelman, ‘Whose Civilizing Misson?’ History Today.

Jacob Soll, ‘How Islam Shaped the Enlightenment,’ The New Republic.

Robert Mackey, ‘In a Fight Over Syria, Echoes of Spain’s Civil War and the Battle for Truth in Guernica,’ The Intercept.

Maggie Astor, ‘Holocaust is Fading from Memory, Survey Finds,’ The New York Times.

JOSEPH SATISH

Ashok Parthasarathi, ‘Science and Technology Diplomacy – Some Reflections,’ Current Science.

Sita Reddy, ‘Indian Botanicals and Heritage Wars,’ Wellcome Collection.

Snigdha Das, ‘Embrace of an Unforgettable Conservation Crusade Lingers On,’ Down to Earth.

Annabel LaBrecque, ‘The National History Center’s New Teaching Decolonization Resource Collection,’ AHA Today.

JOEL VAN DE SANDE

Siba Grovogui, ‘Future Anterior: A Genealogy of International Relations and Society,’ Blog Siba Grovogui.

Zahid Chaudhary, ‘What Is the Future of Psychoanalysis in the Academy,’ Psychoanalysis and History.

Siba Grovogui, Lecture ‘Our Future’s is Another’s Past,’ Institute for Comparative Modernities, Cornell University.  

What We’re Reading This Week

Batavia, 1682. Atlas of Mutual Heritage and the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Dutch National Library/Wikimedia Commons.

JAMES PARKER

Joanna Kakissis, “An Anti-Immigration Speech Divided Britain 50 Years Ago,” NPR.

Rohan Deb Roy, “Decolonise Science – Time to End Another Imperial Era,” The Conversation.

Colin Grant, “Britain’s Debt to the Windrush Generation,” The New York Review of Books.

George Bisharat, “The Forced Displacement of Palestinians Never Truly Ended,” The Nation.

KRISTIN OBERIANO

Michael Goebel, “A Metropolitan World,” Aeon.

Matthew Longo, “The Border is Not a Wall,” Boston Review.

“There’s a Massive Free Catalogue of Indigenous Films Online – And We Have 6 Picks to Get You Started,” CBC Arts.

TIGER ZHIFU LI

Andrew Field, “Why I Remain in China After All These Years,” Blog Shanghai Sojourns.

Fernando Zamudio-Suarez, “Historians Want to Be Cited in the Media,” The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Antia Wiersma, “History is Relevant Everywhere – An International Scholar’s Perspective on the Annual Meeting,” Blog AHA Today.

Kirsty Needham, “Watershed Moment as Weibo Stops Blocking Gay Content in China,” The Sydney Morning Herald.

The Human Condition and the Laws of War: An Interview with Tanisha Fazal

Dr. Tanisha Fazal

Today, declarations of war belong to the museum of international history. Most states no longer declare war (e.g. Ukraine, Afghanistan, Korea) and often resist signing peace treaties. This has not always been the case. Until the late 1940s, half of all interstate wars were formally declared and seven out of ten ended with a formal peace treaty.

In Wars of Law, Unintended Consequences in the Regulation of Armed Conflict (Cornell, 2018), Tanisha Fazal, an associate professor of political science at the University of Minnesota, argues that declarations of war and peace treaties are more than legal niceties alone. In fact, they can tell us when wars begin and end; can trigger the laws of war; and can set the legal boundaries of wartime. In her book, she suggests the proliferation of increasingly restrictive laws of war has, ‘in a perverse unintended consequence,’ critically altered the incentives for belligerents to formally declare war or peace.

Fazal argues warring parties have stopped filing formal declarations of war and signing interstate peace treaties in order to create ambiguity as to whether the laws of war apply. An important reason for this development, she claims, is the growing split between the ‘lawmakers’ (humanitarians) and ‘lawtakers’ (soldiers). With the declining percentage of military representatives at lawmaking conferences, the laws of war have become increasingly restrictive on those applying them in times of war. 

The main consequence of this proliferation of tougher restrictions for warmaking is, according to Fazal, that states increasingly tend to frame their wars as ‘counterterrorism’. Some states today are both never and always in a state that approximates war. Fazal first encountered this puzzle when she witnessed how after 9/11 US troops invaded Afghanistan without filing a formal declaration of war. With the Bush Administration’s initial decision to reject applying the Geneva Conventions, she found that the laws of war created ‘perverse incentives’ for warring parties to engage in legal gymnastics to limit their obligations in wartime. The rising costs of compliance with ever-higher standards, she claims, have encouraged states to avoid stepping over ‘any bright lines’ that would directly oblige them to comply with the rules of war. 

What We’re Reading This Week

James Baldwin with Marlon Brando, 1963 (Wikimedia).

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Daniel Luban, ‘In Marx’s Republic,’ The Nation.

Pankaj Mishra, ‘Jordan Peterson & Fascist Mysticism,’ The New York Review of Books.

Anu Kumar, ‘100 Years on, Remembering the Hindu-German Conspiracy to Violently Overthrow the British Raj,’ Scroll.in.

D.T. Max, ‘The Chinese Workers Who Assemble Designer Bags in Tuscany,’ The New Yorker.

COLLIN BERNARD

Michael Behrent, ‘Age of Emancipation,’ Dissent.

James Meek, ‘NHS SOS,’ London Review of Books.

Ed Pavlic, ‘Baldwin’s Lonely Country,’ Boston Review.

Jeremiah Jenne, ‘Cosmopolitan Colonialism,’ China Channel LA Review of Books.

MARTIN CREVIER

Soutik Biswas, ‘What a Skull in an English Pub Says About India’s 1857 Mutiny,’ BBC.

William Dalrymple, ‘The East India Company: The Original Corporate Raiders,’ The Guardian.

Vann R. Newkirk, ‘The Whitewashing of King’s Assassination,’ The Atlantic.…

What We’re Reading This Week

Saba Mahmood, Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.

FATMA ALADAĞ

Gabriela Marcovich, “On the Potentialities (and Limits) of Collaboration in Global History,” L’Atelier.

Priya Satia, “The Whitesplaining of History is Over,” The Chronicle.

Sagnik Dutta, “Remembering Saba Mahmood,” The Wire.

Kris Manjapara, “When Will Britain Face Up to its Crimes Against Humanity?,” The Guardian.

ADEN KNAAP

Rana Dasgupta, “The Demise of the Nation State,” The Guardian.

Several authors, “The Awakening,” The Chronicle.

Sarah Dunstan, “A Conversation with Professor Stefanos Geroulanos,” JHI Blog.

Amia Srinivasan, “Does Anyone Have the Right to Sex?,” London Review of Books.

SEAN PHILLIPS

Benjamin Mountford & Stephen Tufnell, “How Gold Rushes Helped Make Modern History,” The Conversation.

John Motyka, “Alfred Crosby, ‘Father of Environmental History,’ Is Dead at 87,” The New York Times.

Christopher Bae, “In to Asia,” Aeon.

Rohan Deb Roy, “Decolonise Science – Time to End Another Imperial Era,” The Conversation.

What We’re Reading This Week

Wünsdorf mosque – built by Allied Muslim POWs.

CAROLINE KAHLENBERG

Elizabeth Dore, ‘Which Way for Cuba?,’ Dissent.

Ab Cahan, ‘My First Pesach in America – In 1883,’ Forward.

Walter Johnson, ‘Guns in the Family,’ Boston Review.

Rachel Syme, ‘The Fate of the Juicy Couture Tracksuit in the Age of Athleisure,’ The New Yorker.

CHRIS SZABLA

Christian Schröder, ‘Der Islam gehört zu Preußen (‘Islam Belongs to Prussia’),’ Der Tagesspiegel.

Linda Colley, ‘Can History Help?,’ London Review of Books.

Pankaj Mishra, ‘Crisis in Modern Masculinity,’ The Guardian.

Priya Satia, ‘The Whitesplaining of History is Over,’ Chronicle of Higher Education.

JOSEPH SATISH

Sheila Jasanoff and Benjamin Hurlbut, ‘A Global Observatory for Gene Editing,’ Nature.

Aarthi Sridhar, ‘A Journey with the Sacred Chank,’ Frontline.

Ian Scoones, ‘Realising an Emancipatory Rural Politics in the Face of Authoritarian Populism,’ Open Democracy.

Jordan Collver, ‘My Evolution: Living Along the Spectrum of Science and Religion,’ Science Religion Spectrum.

What We’re Reading This Week

Book Cover ‘Zabiba and the King,’ Saddam Hussein

JAMES PARKER

Bronwen Everill, ‘Demarginalizing West Africa in the Age of Revolutions,’ Blog Age of Revolutions.

Miriam Abaya, ‘The Resignation of Old Leaders Does Not Guarantee a New Era of Leadership in Africa,’ Blog Africa@LSE.

Ben Reynolds, ‘Some Problems in the Theory of Imperialism,’ Fragments.

Adam J. Sacks, ‘”All Humans Are Born Equal”,’ Jacobin.

JOSHUA MILSTEIN

Samuel Loncar, ‘Decolonizing Philosophy,’ LA Review of Books Marginalia.

Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Erica Frantz, ‘Putin’s Seccession Conundrum,’Foreign Affairs.

Colin Dickey, ‘Why Dictators Write,’The New Republic.

Josh Freedman, ‘The Sincere Indignation of Simon Leys,’ LA Review of Books China Channel.

BOYD VAN DIJK

Adam Tooze, ‘Notes on the Global Condition,’ Blog Adam Tooze.

Jennifer Wilson, ‘Floating in the Air,’ The Nation.

Stephen Wertheim and Thomas Meaney, ‘When the Leader of the Free World Is an Ugly American,’ The New York Times.

Brian Urquhart, ‘One Angry Man,’ The New York Review of Books.

What We’re Reading This Week

MARTIN CREVIER Christopher Heaney, “As Peru Heads to the 2018 World Cup, Its Star Striker Has Three Inca Mummies to Thank,” The New Yorker. Monica Hesse, “The Secret History of America’s Ailing Presidents and the Doctors Who Covered Up For Them,” The Washington Post. Agnès de Féo, “Pourquoi on n’a aucun mal à dire coiffeuse beaucoup plus à…