All posts by Fatma Aladag

CFP: Global Histories: A Student Journal

Graduate student readers should consider this great call for submissions for the journal Global Histories. The call explains more:

In recent years, global history has become one of the most ambitious and promising strands of historical research. The approach targets relations, flows, and actors that challenge the assumption of the nation state as a natural and inevitable category of historical analysis. It calls attention to the importance of transnational, trans-regional, or trans-local connections and their influence on the past.

But how can we actually “do global history” in practical terms? To which issues and themes does global historical research add insight? How can global history complement but also challenge other disciplines? And conversely, what critiques and new ideas can other disciplines bring to global history?

To contribute possible answers to these questions, we encourage the submission of research articles that exemplify concrete research informed by global historical perspectives or reflect relevant methodological considerations. The wide range of questions pursued in the research articles previously published in Global Histories may serve as a starting point for your consideration:

http://www.globalhistories.com/index.php/GHSJ/issue/archive

We also welcome the submission of history conference reviews. Please review a history conference which you have attended in the last months, focusing on how the conference was intellectually conceptualized and how it related to wider trends within the discipline of history.

Who We Are

Global Histories is a student-run open-access journal based in the MA Global History program at Humboldt-Universität and Freie Universität in Berlin. We are looking for submissions from fellow students across the world for our journal’s fifth issue which is to be published in April 2018.

Submissions

Article submissions should be 5000-7000 words and conference reviews approximately 1000-1500 words. All submissions must be in English, follow the Chicago Manual of Style for Notes and Bibliography and must not be under review or have been previously published elsewhere. For more detailed information on our submission guidelines please consult: http://www.globalhistories.com/index.php/GHSJ/about/submissions

Authors should register on our website www.globalhistories.com to submit their work. Questions related to topics or submissions should be directed to submissions@globalhistories.com well in advance of the January 1st, 2018 final deadline.

CFP: Global History Student Conference (Berlin, Germany, June 9-10, 2018)

For graduate student readers of the Global History Blog, this recent call for applications is for you. The students of the Global History MA program at Humboldt University Berlin and Free University Berlin have announced “Global History Student Conference 2018” in Berlin. This graduate student-focused conference on global history provides the opportunity to enhance academic network and experience for early career researchers! The call explains more:

We have now opened our Call for Applications for next year’s GHSConference to be held on June 9th and 10th in Berlin!

We are excited about your proposals for presentations to be submitted on this website before February 1st, 2018.

The core of the conference’s program are the all-student panels, the keynote lecture will be given by Prof. Sebastian Conrad, head of Freie Universität’s Center for Global History and we will offer several workshops to familiarize you with alternative approaches to studying and presenting history.

We invite you to submit research projects of different time periods, crossing geographical but also disciplinary boundaries. The goal is to exchange experiences and to work together in an open and non-competitive way which is why we explicitly invite undergraduate students to apply: if you have ever written a paper or essay in this field, this is the perfect place to present it!

You find all further information in the actual Call for Applications, if any questions remain unanswered, please do not hesitate to email us to globalhistorystudentconference@gmail.com.

Please share this call with your friends and co-students, we are looking forward to reading your abstracts!

The 1970s in Arab-American Perspective: An Interview with Salim Yaqub

Richard Nixon and Anwar Sadat ride past cheering crowds in Alexandria, Egypt, June 1974. Provided by the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

In recent months, a young and charismatic Arab-American doctor running for governor of Michigan has stirred up US politics. The son of Arab immigrants in the United States, Abdul El-Sayed is part of the latest generation of Arab-Americans. El-Sayed and people like him suggest a significant sociological transformation taking place within the Arab-American community. Their political activism can be seen as a generational leap beyond the activism of their fathers and grandfathers.

Continue reading

CFP: Business History on Commodity Trading Companies in the First Global Economy, 1870-1929 (Norwegian University, Norway)

For those interested in the global economy, this recent call for paper is for you! The editors, Marten Boon and Espen Storli from Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim invite article submissions for “a special issue on commodity trading companies in the first global economy” titled “Business History on Commodity Trading Companies in the First Global Economy, 1870-1929.” The call for papers explains more:

Business History (ISSN 0007-6791) calls for articles for a special issue on commodity trading companies in the first global economy. The special issue aims to present new, transnational research on the evolution of global business in the period between 1870 and 1929. Although the issue’s focus is on the activities of commodity trading companies, we seek contributions that engage their historical experience and evolution within a global value chain framework. We therefore welcome proposals for articles that identify the key roles played by commodity trading companies and their interaction with local entrepreneurs, traders and middlemen, multinational companies and political actors in establishing the global value chains for primary commodities that entered the global economy in this period. By investigating how different actors connected and integrated the world through physically moving and transforming commodities, the special issue makes a unique contribution to our understanding of economic globalization and the evolution of global business. Specifically, the issue charts and compares the variety of globalisation trajectories and experiences of companies, commodities and regions in the first global economy.
We welcome proposals covering a wide range of regions and primary commodities, from minerals to metals to energy and soft commodities. Proposed articles should engage with the following research questions: Who were the commodity trading companies that shaped global commodity chains? How did they organise their business across borders and continents? How did they interact with other key actors, such as local entrepreneurs, traders and middlemen, multinational companies and political actors? How did their interaction shape global commodity markets and value chains, and why did these change over time? We especially invite comparative contributions, comparing company cases, regions or commodities over time. We also give preference to articles integrating Western and non-Western perspectives, in particular if they engage with questions of globalization and localization, such as why some localities were more resilient to the penetration of foreign capital than others, how trading companies acted to overcome these barriers and why they succeeded or failed.

Proposals should be submitted before November 30th, 2017 and should be no more than 1,000 words in length. It is also possible to hand in full papers or extended abstracts. Proposals should shortly describe the topic, relevance and brief outline of the paper as well as discuss the method and sources. Selected contributors will be expected to hand in a full paper by early March 2018 and participate in a publication preparation workshop to be held in March 2018. We look to submit final versions for peer-review by late Spring 2018. Please send proposals to Espen Storli (espen.storli@ntnu.no) or Marten Boon (marten.boon@ntnu.no). 

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor Position, Portland State University

For those global historians looking for an academic position, here is a recent call for applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position at The Department of International and Global Studies at Portland State University. The call for applications explains more:

The Department of International and Global Studies at Portland State University is seeking candidates for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position to begin September 2018. The candidate should have expertise demonstrated through their thesis topic, teaching, or research in one or more of the following areas: Social Justice, International Crisis Management, Migration, Human Rights, and Public Policy. The candidate should also have a regional area of expertise in one of the following: Africa, Asia, the Middle East, or a transnational focus.

A PhD is required in a relevant field. ABDs will be considered but must have completed their PhD by the start of the appointment. Evidence of successful teaching (at least one course taught either as a degree candidate or afterwards, or have served as a graduate teaching assistant for three courses). Candidates should have a demonstrated familiarity with and ability to attract external funding, which includes at least one grant application of a minimum of $5,000.

The successful candidate will teach courses that include core classes, electives and a seminar, while incorporating issues of culture, class, race and gender. They should also adopt an interdisciplinary and non-Western perspective in their teaching. The candidate will have to teach some hybrid and online classes.

To apply, candidates should use the application form accessible at this website. Good luck!

Postdoctoral Fellowship: The Buffett Institute, Northwestern University

For those readers of the Global History Blog looking for a post-doctoral fellowship, here’s the good opportunity on global, transnational and international studies. The Buffett Institute for Global Studies of Northwestern University has announced two-year postdoctoral fellowship application on any range of social science. The call for applications explains more:

About this fellowship

The Buffett Institute invites applications for two-year postdoctoral fellowships in the study of global, comparative, or international affairs. Up to three fellows will be selected. Applications are welcome from scholars from any range of social science or interdisciplinary perspectives whose research addresses global, international, or transnational social processes, problems, governance, or conflicts.

Each fellow will be affiliated with the Buffett Institute and an appropriate department in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences (political science, history, sociology, anthropology, etc.), the School of Communication(performance studies, radio/television/film, communication studies, and theater), or the School of Education and Social Policy.

Applicants should not contact the department or any faculty at this time.

Fellowship details 

Fellows will pursue a program of independent scholarship and teach one quarter-long undergraduate class each academic year. They will work with their affiliate departments to determine course subject matter and scheduling over the two years of the fellowship.

Fellows will deliver one public lecture at Buffett, and they will help organize and run select Buffett Institute programming. In general, they are expected to be active participants in the intellectual activities of both the Buffett Institute and their affiliated disciplinary departments.

Fellows will also work with an assigned faculty mentor. Intended to serve as professional advisers, faculty mentors will help fellows integrate into the Buffett intellectual community.

The salary is $55,000. In addition, fellows are eligible for $5,000 per year to fund research and conference travel and up to $2,000 in reimbursement for allowable relocation expenses in the first year.

This is a full-time, benefits-eligible position.

If this sounds interesting, consider applying via this website.

CFP: Rethinking Power in Global and Transnational History (Fundação Getulio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro)

For those interested in global and transnational history Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional (RBPI) is calling for contributions to a special issue titled “Rethinking Power in Global and Transnational History.” This issue will be devoted to the analysis of power in broad fields such as diplomacy, economy, gender, ethnicity, culture, science, governance.  The call for papers explains more:

The new phase of globalization opened in the 1970s, even if not inaugurating interdependence or interconnectedness, have at least created a new consciousness of how historical process is shared around the globe. In such context, historians have reinforced the call to embrace “global” or “transnational” approaches in order to identify and analyze dynamics or changing features in the development of state, economy, culture, and society formerly ignored or disdained by scholarship.

These perspectives have engulfed the long-term challenge of old national histories and area studies. They are not truly new, neither a turning point for the discipline, as much as Global History should not necessarily be reduced to the history of globalization. One can identify challenges to parochialism and essentialism within the discipline even few decades after Positivism and after Ranke’s German School had re-founded History in mid-Nineteenth Century. Actually, since the early Twentieth-Century, historians of international relations have moved beyond unilateral comparisons and reframed the centrality of diplomatic documents. They have also played down the study of the decision-making process, even when taking into account the weight of structural forces upon decision-makers. State-centrism and the primacy of power have then being challenged. However, strength, control, influence, balance, composition, and agency in political life have not disappeared from the explanatory range of History.

It is in this background and without belittling other perspectives or themes, that Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional – RBPI calls the academic community to submit contributions to its special issue on the analysis of power in a variety of domains, such as diplomacy, economy, gender, ethnicity, culture, science, governance, etc, taking into account the new narratives of Global and Transnational History.

This issue also intends to acknowledge the fact that, in spite of being part of the vocabularies of current historical debate, “Global History” and “Transnational History” do not correspond to a homogeneous body of problems, questions, and methodologies. It is rather a debate in which any author wishing to claim such an approach must be able to somehow stand. Our goal is to stimulate submissions of works shifting parts of the historical discipline to the same direction, but also including discussions over what ‘global’ approaches to history mean and how it can change the discipline.

Finally, we consider that different historical traditions might experience different moments in the evolution of the discipline, especially when taking into account how politics can be influent, even if not determinant, on the work of historians. For instance, historical traditions in Latin America, or even in Asia, are still constrained by national approaches and narratives, sometimes even sustaining exceptionalism for populations accidentally living within the same political borders. The challenging of this reality will also be appreciated in this volume.

The volume will be edited by Alexandre Moreli (Professor of International and Global History at Fundação Getulio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).

RBPI is published exclusively online at Scielo (http://www.scielo.br/rbpi), following the continuous publication model. This model gives faster publication for authors and also faster access for readers because the articles are published online at the very moment their editorial production is finished.

All submissions should be original and unpublished, must be written in English, including an abstract of 70-80 words (and three keywords in English), and follow the Chicago System. They must be in the range of 8.000 words. The deadline for submissions is April 30th, 2018. Submissions must be done at http://www.scielo.br/rbpi (Online Submissions).

Assistant Professor in Global and International Studies (Boston College, Massachusetts, US)

For those TPF readers looking for an assistant professor position in global and international studies, the History Department at Boston College has announced the following job opportunity.  The call for applications explains more:

The History Department at Boston College seeks to hire an Assistant Professor of Global or International History, who will hold a joint appointment with the university’s Program in International Studies. All topical, chronological, and geographical specializations are welcome. The strongest applications will demonstrate attention to the processes and problematics of globalization (e.g., environmental, social, economic, political or cultural dimensions), and a facility with moving between various temporal and spatial scales. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in History by 31 August 2018.

In addition to pursuing an active research program and making other contributions to our intellectual community and to the profession, the successful candidate for this position is expected to teach four courses each academic year that encompass a mix of undergraduate surveys suited to the university’s Core curriculum (http://www.bc.edu/sites/core.html); electives; and graduate colloquia. All four courses will be given history designation, but at least two of them should be clearly relevant for International Studies students. (For information about International Studies: http://www.bc.edu/schools/cas/isp/about.html.)

Applicants for this position should submit a cover letter; a curriculum vitae; a research statement; a one-page summary of teaching experience accompanied by two sample syllabi; an article-length sample of research; and three letters of recommendation. Please submit these materials to Interfolio (http://apply.interfolio.com/43690) no later than 13 October 2017. Interviews will be conducted at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting in January 2018.

Boston College is a Jesuit, Catholic university that strives to integrate research excellence with a dedication to student formation within a liberal arts environment. Boston College is also an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of any legally protected category. 

For more information, visit this link.

Workshop: “Global Cultural Encounters (1750-1950)” (University of Michigan, August 2-4, 2017)

For readers of the Global History Blog, here’s a recent call for attendance at a workshop titled “Global Cultural Encounters (1750-1950)” at the University of Michigan on August 2-4, 2017. The workshop that will take place with the participation of many important scholars including Albert Wu, who was previously interviewed by the Toynbee Foundation.

Sponsored by the Thyssen Foundation, the workshop, “Global Cultural Encounters, – Between the Material and Immaterial, 1750-1950,” explores our world’s interconnectedness since the modern era. The workshop will take place at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Program

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

3:00–3:30 Registration

3:30–3:45 Welcome Address
Geoff Eley (University of Michigan), History Department Chair

3:45–4:00 Opening Remarks
Harry Liebersohn (University of Illinois) / Kira Thurman (University of Michigan) / Stefan Hübner (National University of Singapore)

4:00–5:00 Introductions and Discussion of Scholarly Goals

5:00 Reception

Thursday, August 3, 2017

9:30–11:00 Panel 1: The Pursuit of Scientific Knowledge in the Age of Empire
Chair: Harry Liebersohn (University of Illinois)

Moritz von Brescius (University of Konstanz), “German Science in the Age of Empire: Enterprise, Opportunity and the Schlagintweit Brothers”

Simon Layton (Queen Mary University of London), “The Sartorial Science of Sir Joseph Banks”

11:00–11:15 Coffee Break

11:15–12:45: Panel 2: The British in South Asia; South Asia in Great Britain
Chair: Amanda Armstrong-Price (University of Michigan)

  1. Barton Scott (University of Toronto), “Translated Freedoms: Karsandas Mulji’s Travels in England and the Anthropology of the Victorian Self”

Teresa Segura–Garcia (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), “Princely Alliances on a Global Stage: Baroda, the British Empire, and the World, c. 1875–1939”

12:45–2:00 Lunch Break

2:00 – 4:15 Panel 3: Musical Diasporas
Chair: Jesse Hoffnung–Garskoff (University of Michigan)

Kira Thurman (University of Michigan), “Encountering Beethoven in Rural Alabama: German Music and Black Education in the United States, 1870–1940”

Ted Sammons (University of Toronto), “From the Workshop to the World: Jazz Jamaica and the Black Freedom Movement”

meLê yamomo (Free University of Berlin), “Globalization in cylinders: Auditioning the early global acoustic epistemology”

4:15–4:30 Coffee Break

4:30–6:00 Panel 4: Global Ideological Encounters in East Asia
Chair: Perrin Selcer (University of Michigan)

Yurou Zhong (University of Toronto), “Toward a Chinese Grammatology”

Stefan Huebner (National University of Singapore), “The ‘Oceanic Colonizing Mission’ and floating city projects since the 1950s”

Friday, August 4, 2017

9:30–11:00 Panel 5: Colonial Projects in/and the Middle East in the Interwar Era
Chair: Melanie Tanelian (University of Michigan)

Elizabeth Matsushita (University of Illinois), “Alexis Chottin’s Moroccan Music: Race, Colonialism, and Modernity in the Protectorate’s Musicological Project”

Shuang Wen (National University of Singapore), “The YMCA and the Arab–Chinese Laborers in WWI”

11:00–11:15 Coffee Break

11:15–12:45 Panel 6: Policing the Body under Colonial Rule
Chair: Victor Mendoza (University of Michigan)

Emma Thomas (University of Michigan), “Rape, Indenture, and the Colonial Courts in German New Guinea”

T.J. Tallie (Washington and Lee University), “Sobriety and Settlement: the Racialized Politics of Alcohol Use in Colonial Natal”

12:45–2:00 Lunch Break

2:00–3:30 Panel 7: Measuring the Body: Global Medicine and Anthropology under Empire

Chair: Zhiying Ma (University of Michigan)

Albert Wu (American University of Paris), “Superstition and Quackery: Scenes from a Global History”

Fenneke Sysling (University of Utrecht), “Anthropometry and the human Wallace line”

3:30–3:45 Coffee Break

3:45–5:00 Final Discussion, Possible Plans for the Future, and Closing Remarks

Harry Liebersohn (University of Illinois)

6:00 Conference Dinner 

If you are interested in attending, please email Kira Thurman: thurmank(at)umich.edu

CFP: YEARBOOK OF TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY (SECOND VOLUME)

For readers interested in transnational history, the second volume of The Yearbook of Transnational History (YTH) is accepting articles for publication. The call for papers explains more:

The Yearbook of Transnational History (YTH) is a newly established peer-reviewed annual journal published by Fairleigh Dickinson University Press/Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group. This annual is dedicated to publishing and disseminating pioneering research in the field of transnational history for an (maybe add interdisciplinary and diverse) international audience.

Exile and Refugee

The focus of the second volume of YTH, is “exile and refugees.” Political changes, revolutions, and military conflict have always forced individuals of very different political orientation, religious belief, and ethnic belonging to leave the country of their birth. In some cases, people’s refugee status has been temporary, in other cases permanent. Often exiles and refugees became citizens of the country to which they fled. Exile and refuge are an important, and yet understudied, phenomenon of modern history. The French Revolution forced both royalists and revolutionaries into exile. The European-wide Revolution of 1848/49 created a stream of refugees who exerted significant influence on the political and social life of the United States. The Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, Josef Stalin’s terror, Adolf Hitler’s ascension to power in 1933, the defeat of Nazism in 1945, the Greek Civil War (1946-1949), Mao Zedong’s victory in the Chinese Civil War in 1950, the Hungarian Uprising in 1956, the Prague Spring in 1968, Pinochet’s putsch in Chile in 1973, the defeat of the United States in Vietnam in 1975, and the fall of European Communism in the early 1990s, to name just the most prominent events, created a steady stream of exiles and refugees across the globe and turned citizens into refugees and exiles. The group of exiles and refugees included men and women of very different political, social, and economic backgrounds. Among them were Friedrich Hecker, Lajos Kossuth, Leon Trotsky, Albert Einstein, Wernher von Braun, Adolf Eichmann, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Michelle Bachelet, Dean Reed, and Margot Honecker.

In the last five years, academics, journalists, lawyers, politicians, and individuals from several other professions have fled countries such as Turkey, Russia, North Korea, China and settled in countries that offered them a new home. Individuals from developed democracies like Australia and the United States also sometimes seek exile abroad as the examples of Julian Assange and Edward Snowden indicate. As the conflict in Syria and the threat of ISIS persist, refugees from the Middle East are fleeing to Europe and North America. Today, the United Nations estimates that there are about 4.8 million Syrian refugees and 6 million displaced Syrians.

We invite submissions from scholars who work on the phenomenon of exile, refugees, and asylum seekers from the eighteenth century to the present day. We are especially interested in manuscripts that discuss the contributions made by exiles and refugees to the political, cultural, and economic life of the countries that accepted them. We are, of course, also interested in articles that deal with the impact diaspora communities formed by exiles and refugees had back in their home countries. We hope to receive papers that deal with individuals and their contributions to their second home country, papers on groups of exiles and refugees and their impact on their host countries, and systematic papers that provide a theoretical approach to exile and refugee studies as part of the transnational paradigm.

We welcome articles from both professionals and advanced PhD students that are based upon original research. Articles should be between 7,000 and 10,000 words (including footnotes) and follow Chicago Style.

Submissions should be emailed to the editor, Professor Thomas Adam, tjth@fdu.edu by November 1, 2017 to be considered for inclusion in the second volume. Please ensure that you have included all relevant contact information on a separate page, including your name, your professional or institutional affiliation, and a permanent e-mail address. The main document should be prepared for blind review and not include any author information.