Author: tnunan

Global History Forum: Discussing “Starvation and the State: Famine, Slavery, and Power in Sudan, 1883-1956” with Steven Serels

For most audiences today, the word “Sudan” evokes images at once terrorizing and timeless. Older readers may recall the images of emaciated bodies that television crews relayed from western and eastern Sudan during the great famines of the mid-1980s. Anyone reading today, however, will remember the outrage – but also lack of meaningful reaction – that the Sudanese government’s terror in the western region of Darfur evoked during the early 2000s. (Those wars, which then-Secretary of State Colin Powell called genocide, still continue.) According to these images, Sudan remains at once black, Arab, Muslim, poor, hungry; but also – crucially – in the present. Appalled by the horrors of famine and genocide, it is easy to forget to probe the past – a colonial past – to inquire after the structural roots of hunger and famine not as an accident but as an accomplishment of modern state-making. Moral outrage and a human rights-inflected imagination may be important, but it’s solid empirical history that furnishes an understanding of the roots of crises like those that plague – or define – Sudanese stateness.

That’s why the Global History Forum was delighted to sit down recently with Steven Serels, a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies and Weatherhead Initiative on Global History. Steven, whose first book, Starvation and the State: Famine, Slavery, and Power in Sudan, 1883-1956, was just published by Palgrave MacMillan in December 2013, graciously met with GHF to discuss his work, his future agenda, and – at the center of it all – Sudan and the broader region and even world order that the country fits into.

Two International and Global History Conferences for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Scholars

It’s not always easy for graduate students and post-doctoral scholars to find the right venues to present work in progress. Sometimes, graduate students can feel hesitant about making the transition from seminar paper to conference paper – and thence to dissertation or book chapter. Even post-doctoral scholars can face similar challenges, whether it’s to do…

Dipesh Chakrabarty Named 2014 Toynbee Prize Recipient

The Toynbee Prize Foundation has selected Dipesh Chakrabarty, Lawrence A. Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, as the recipient of the 2014 Toynbee Prize. The Prize, given every other year to a distinguished practitioner of global history, will be formally awarded at a session of the American Historical Association’s Annual Meeting in…

LSE IDEAS

LSE IDEAS was founded in 2008 and now runs a series of regional and topical programmes. The centre currently does research on the international affairs of East and Southeast Asia, the Balkans, the United States, the Middle East, Latin America, Africa and on the history of the Cold War. With the International History and International…

International Security Studies at Yale

International Security Studies (ISS) at Yale was founded in 1988 and is co-directed by Paul M. Kennedy and Adam Tooze. Our unit is supported by the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Jewett Foundation, and the Friends of ISS.  John Lewis Gaddis directs the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, which operates under ISS’s auspices. Although ISS is not a degree-granting program, our faculty members write and…