What We’re Reading This Week

Eugène Delacroix: Liberty Leading the People, 1830. Source: Musée du Louvre, Paris.

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Alf Gunvald Nilsen, ‘How Can We Understand India’s Agrarian Struggle Beyond “Modi Sarkar Murdabad”?,’ EPW.

‘What Europeans Talk About When They Talk About Brexit,’ London Review of Books.

Peter Baker, ‘”We The People”: The Battle to Define Populism,’ The Guardian.

Gautam Bhatia, ‘ICLP Round Table: Oranit Shani’s “How India Became Democratic” – I: Laying the Foundations,’ Indian Constitutional Law and Philosophy.

COLLIN BERNARD

Adam Tooze, ‘Framing Crashed (8) – Provincializing Europe?,’ Blog Adam Tooze.

David Bell, ‘The Many Lives of Liberalism,’ The New York Review of Books.

Kevin Kruse and Julian Zelizer, ‘Have We had Enough of the Imperial Presidency Yet?,’ The New York Times.

Erin Bartram, ‘How Ph.D.s Romanticize the “Regular” Job Market,’ The Chronicle of Higher Education.

ADEN KNAAP

Gurminder K. Bhambra, ‘Brexit, Empire, and Decolonization,’ History Workshop.

Jon Piccini, ‘A White Working Man’s Country,’ Flood Media.

Daniel Denvir and Melinda Cooper, ‘Family Values with Melinda Cooper,’ The Dig.

Jeanne Morefield, ‘Trump’s Foreign Policy Isn’t the Problem,’ Boston Review.

Gil Rubin, ‘Beyond the Zionist Nation-State,’ Tablet.

What We’re Reading This Week

United Nations Social Committee chair Eleanor Roosevelt (right) with colleagues of Venezuela.

NATALIE BEHRENDS

Danielle Jackson, ‘Memory and the Lost Cause,’ Longreads.

Peter Brown, ‘Between Two Empires,’ The New York Review of Books.

Daniel Rodgers, ‘The Uses and Abuses of “Neoliberalism”,’ Dissent.

Daniel Stolz, ‘The Lighthouse and the Observatory,’ Jadaliyya.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Santanu Das, ‘Indians in World War One,’ Historyextra.

Livia Gershon, ‘What Does History Smell Like,’ JSTOR Daily.

‘Why do the British Know so Little about Irish History?,’ History Today.

BOYD VAN DIJK

Arundhati Roy and Avni Sejpal, ‘How to Think About Empire,’ Boston Review.

Alex Shams, ‘The Weaponization of Nostalgia,’ Ajam Media Collective.

Robert Zaretsky, ‘Michel Houellebecq Hated Europe Before You Did,’ Foreign Policy.

Yehudah Mirsky, ‘The End of the World That 1948 Made,’ Tablet.

Dominic Sachsenmaier’s Laudation for 2019 Toynbee Prize winner Lauren Benton

Dominic Sachsenmaier, President of the Toynbee Prize Foundation, delivered the following laudation in awarding the 2019 Toynbee Prize to Lauren Benton, Nelson O. Tyrone, Jr. Professor of History and Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University. The prize was formally awarded to Benton at the 133rd Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Chicago. Benton then delivered…

What We’re Reading This Week

Tabula Peutingeriana (Ancient Jew Review).

JOSEPH SATISH

Matan Rochlitz, “Liberation of the Soul Through Diet – How a Jain Ascetic Lives,” Aeon.

Rajan Krishnan, “Patel Statue and Pillage of History,” Frontline.

“Too Late in the Day? Dr MS Swaminathan Clarifies His Views on GMO,” Swarajya.

CHRIS SZABLA

Dmitri van den Meerssche, “Interview: Martti Koskenniemi on International Law and the Rise of the Far-Right,” OpinioJuris.

Jonathon Catlin, “Koselleck and the Image,” JHIBlog.

Farah Mohammed, “The New Meaning of Monuments,” JSTOR Daily.

JOSHUA MILSTEIN

Timothy Luckritz Marquis, “Journeys in the Roman East,” Ancient Jew Review.

Adam Kotsko, “The Political Theology of Trump,” N+1.

Eric Weitz, “The Soviet Union and the Creation of the International Human Rights System,” Zeitgeschichte Online.

JAMES PARKER

Susie Linfield, “Growing Up After Genocide,” Dissent.

Ashoka Mukpo, “The Tyranny of Good Intentions,” Africa is a Country.

Kim Phillips-Fein, “The Making of Twentieth Century New York,” The Nation.

What We’re Reading This Week

Christiansborg Castle, Danish National Museum.

COLLIN BERNARD

Alex Traub, “India’s Dangerous New Curriculum,” New York Review of Books.

Helen Thompson, “The Unintended Euro and the Problem of Italy,” Speri Comment.

Matthew Lee and Mark Stevenson, “US and Mexico Face Stark Choice as New President Takes Over,” AP.

Alexander Diener and Joshua Hagen, “The City as a Palimpsest and Crucible of National Identity,” Global Urban History.

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Nile Green, “A Muslim Founder of the Social Sciences,” LA Review of Books.

Dag Herbjornsrud, “First Women of Philosophy,” Aeon.

Noah Kulwin, “Yesterday’s News,” The Baffler.

Roxanne Panchasi, “A Colonial Affair,” New Books network.

MARTIN CREVIER

Zita Nunes, “Remembering the Howard University Librarian Who Decolonized the Way Books Were Catalogued,” Smithsonian.com.

Christopher Given-Wilson, “How the Inkas Governed, Thrived and Fell Without Alphabetic Writing,” Aeon.

Padraic Scanlan, “Damon’s Case and the Meaning of British Antislavery,” EuropeNow.

FATMA ALADAG

Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, “Slavers in the Family: What a Castle in Accra Reveals about Ghana’s History,” The Conversation.

Christopher Cannon Jones, “From Protestant Supremacy to Christian Slavery,” Black Perspectives.

What We’re Reading This Week

“New Texts Out Now: Lebanon, a Country in Fragments,” Jadaliyya.

Andrew Bacevich, “Zbigniew Brzeinski’s Cold War,” The Nation.

John Connelly, “The Polish Predicament,” LA Review of Books.

David Montero, “The Second Half of Watergate Was Bigger, Worse, and Forgotten By The Public,” Longreads.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Stephen Moss, “Serhii Plokhy: ‘Chernobyl Exposed Soviet Secrecy’,” The Guardian.

Martins Kwazema, “Capturing the Hyper-Present: Breathing Pasts in a Living Present,” Global History Lab.

Farah Mohammed, “The New Meaning of Monuments,” JSTOR Daily.

SEAN PHILLIPS

Harriet Mercer, “Archives of the Anthropocene,” History Workshop.

Ian Johnson, “The Uighurs and China’s Long History of Trouble with Islam,” NYR Daily.

Olivia Waxman, “‘We Became Warriors Again’,” Time.

Andrew Anthony, “Interview Peter Frankopan,” The Guardian.

CfP: Imperial Legacies of 1919 (Texas, April 2019)

The next year will see the culmination of a half decade of events celebrating and commemorating the centenary of the First World War – a year in which the focus will be on the conflict’s aftermaths and consequences. And at a time when much of the reassessment of the Great War has been concerned with contributions from and effects on colonial territories – which helped truly make the event a war that spanned the world – several conferences have and will be turning their gaze toward the impact of the conflagration on empire, broadly speaking, integrating its impact on such events that are also seeing their centenary as the Amritsar Massacre, the First Egyptian Revolution, and the Third Anglo-Afghan War.

In that vein, the University of North Texas, located in Denton – part of the Dallas-Forth Worth metropolitan area – has invited paper and panel proposals focused on the imperial legacies of the conflict.…

What We’re Reading This Week

Silk spinning, Chinese illustration, dated 1696. Source: https://www.historytoday.com/reviews/global-success-silk.

TIGER ZHIFU LI

Denise Fisher, “Explainer: New Caledonia’s Independence Referendum, and How It Could Impact the Region,” The Conversation.

Yogita Limaye, “Sri Lanka Crisis: Ousted PM ‘Has Confidence of Parliament’,” BBC News.

Charlotte Macdonald, “A Report Following Suffrage Week 2018,” The New Zealand Historical Association Blog.

James Croot, “They Shall Not Grow Old: Kiwi Screenings Confirmed for Sir Peter Jackson’s WWI Documentary,” Stuff.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Steve Humphries, “The Last Survivors of the First World War,” Historyextra.

“‘Islam’ as an Epistemic Field: Imperial Entanglements and Orientalism in the German-Speaking World Since 1870,” Trafo.

James Macdonald, “The Curious Voyage of HMS Endeavour,” JSTOR Daily.

Evelyn Welch, “The Global Success of Silk,” History Today.

BOYD VAN DIJK

Damon Linker, “Did Max Boot Turn His Back on the Republican Party, or Did the Party Turn Its Back on Him?,” The New York Times.

Christopher Lee, “Fanon’s Fugitive Archive,” Africa Is a Country.

Richard Toye, “Fidelity Capitalism and the Airline Industry: An Interview with James Vernon,” Imperial & Global Forum.

Claudia Sadowski-Smith, “The New Immigrant Whiteness: Race, Neoliberalism, and Post-Soviet Migration to the United States,” New Books Network.…

What We’re Reading This Week

Patient, Surrey County Lunatic Asylum (1850-58). The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

COLLIN BERNARD

Quinn Slobodian, “Trump, Populists and the Rise of Right-Wing Globalization,” The New York Times.

Seyla Benhabib, “Below the Asphalt Lies the Beach,” Boston Review.

Nadezhda Azhgikhina, “Russia’s Unlearned Lessons From the Failed Revolt of 1993,” The Nation.

Achin Vanaik, “India’s Two Hegemonies,” New Left Review.

MATTHEW BOWSER

Faisal Devji, “Jamal Khashoggi and the Competing Visions of Islam,” The New York Times.

“‘Iconic’ Image of Palestinian Protestor in Gaza Goes Viral,” Al Jazeera.

Tess Riley, “Just 100 Companies Responsible for 71% of Global Emissions, Study Says,” The Guardian.

“Episode 26: Cold War Legacies Roundtable,” Breaking History Podcast.

MARTIN CREVIER

Andrew Harry, “A Dead Sea Scrolls Forgery Casts Doubt on the Museum of the Bible Controversy,” The Atlantic.

Paige Raibmon, “Provincializing Europe in Canadian History; Or, How to Talk about Relations between Indigenous Peoples and Europeans,” Active History.

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Theodore Porter, “Madhouse Genetics,” Aeon.

Anne Schult, “Sovereignty, Property, and the Locus of Power,” JHI Blog.

Kate Wagner, “The Palace and the Storm,” The Baffler.

Kwame Anthony Appiah, “The Myth of Meritocracy: Who Really Gets What They Deserve?,” The Guardian.

DEXTER GOVAN

Soutik Biswas, “Delhi Smog: Foul Air Came from India’s Farming Revolution,” BBC.

Stephen Daker, “The Spectre of Militant,” New Socialist.

Matthew Engel, “A View From the Border: Ireland on the Brink of Brexit,” New Statesman.

Aditya Chakrabortty, “Britain Fell for a Neoliberal Con Trick – Even the IMF Says So,” The Guardian.