What We’re Reading This Week

Christiansborg Castle, Danish National Museum.

COLLIN BERNARD

Alex Traub, “India’s Dangerous New Curriculum,” New York Review of Books.

Helen Thompson, “The Unintended Euro and the Problem of Italy,” Speri Comment.

Matthew Lee and Mark Stevenson, “US and Mexico Face Stark Choice as New President Takes Over,” AP.

Alexander Diener and Joshua Hagen, “The City as a Palimpsest and Crucible of National Identity,” Global Urban History.

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Nile Green, “A Muslim Founder of the Social Sciences,” LA Review of Books.

Dag Herbjornsrud, “First Women of Philosophy,” Aeon.

Noah Kulwin, “Yesterday’s News,” The Baffler.

Roxanne Panchasi, “A Colonial Affair,” New Books network.

MARTIN CREVIER

Zita Nunes, “Remembering the Howard University Librarian Who Decolonized the Way Books Were Catalogued,” Smithsonian.com.

Christopher Given-Wilson, “How the Inkas Governed, Thrived and Fell Without Alphabetic Writing,” Aeon.

Padraic Scanlan, “Damon’s Case and the Meaning of British Antislavery,” EuropeNow.

FATMA ALADAG

Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, “Slavers in the Family: What a Castle in Accra Reveals about Ghana’s History,” The Conversation.

Christopher Cannon Jones, “From Protestant Supremacy to Christian Slavery,” Black Perspectives.

What We’re Reading This Week

“New Texts Out Now: Lebanon, a Country in Fragments,” Jadaliyya.

Andrew Bacevich, “Zbigniew Brzeinski’s Cold War,” The Nation.

John Connelly, “The Polish Predicament,” LA Review of Books.

David Montero, “The Second Half of Watergate Was Bigger, Worse, and Forgotten By The Public,” Longreads.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Stephen Moss, “Serhii Plokhy: ‘Chernobyl Exposed Soviet Secrecy’,” The Guardian.

Martins Kwazema, “Capturing the Hyper-Present: Breathing Pasts in a Living Present,” Global History Lab.

Farah Mohammed, “The New Meaning of Monuments,” JSTOR Daily.

SEAN PHILLIPS

Harriet Mercer, “Archives of the Anthropocene,” History Workshop.

Ian Johnson, “The Uighurs and China’s Long History of Trouble with Islam,” NYR Daily.

Olivia Waxman, “‘We Became Warriors Again’,” Time.

Andrew Anthony, “Interview Peter Frankopan,” The Guardian.

CfP: Imperial Legacies of 1919 (Texas, April 2019)

The next year will see the culmination of a half decade of events celebrating and commemorating the centenary of the First World War – a year in which the focus will be on the conflict’s aftermaths and consequences. And at a time when much of the reassessment of the Great War has been concerned with contributions from and effects on colonial territories – which helped truly make the event a war that spanned the world – several conferences have and will be turning their gaze toward the impact of the conflagration on empire, broadly speaking, integrating its impact on such events that are also seeing their centenary as the Amritsar Massacre, the First Egyptian Revolution, and the Third Anglo-Afghan War.

In that vein, the University of North Texas, located in Denton – part of the Dallas-Forth Worth metropolitan area – has invited paper and panel proposals focused on the imperial legacies of the conflict.…

What We’re Reading This Week

Silk spinning, Chinese illustration, dated 1696. Source: https://www.historytoday.com/reviews/global-success-silk.

TIGER ZHIFU LI

Denise Fisher, “Explainer: New Caledonia’s Independence Referendum, and How It Could Impact the Region,” The Conversation.

Yogita Limaye, “Sri Lanka Crisis: Ousted PM ‘Has Confidence of Parliament’,” BBC News.

Charlotte Macdonald, “A Report Following Suffrage Week 2018,” The New Zealand Historical Association Blog.

James Croot, “They Shall Not Grow Old: Kiwi Screenings Confirmed for Sir Peter Jackson’s WWI Documentary,” Stuff.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Steve Humphries, “The Last Survivors of the First World War,” Historyextra.

“‘Islam’ as an Epistemic Field: Imperial Entanglements and Orientalism in the German-Speaking World Since 1870,” Trafo.

James Macdonald, “The Curious Voyage of HMS Endeavour,” JSTOR Daily.

Evelyn Welch, “The Global Success of Silk,” History Today.

BOYD VAN DIJK

Damon Linker, “Did Max Boot Turn His Back on the Republican Party, or Did the Party Turn Its Back on Him?,” The New York Times.

Christopher Lee, “Fanon’s Fugitive Archive,” Africa Is a Country.

Richard Toye, “Fidelity Capitalism and the Airline Industry: An Interview with James Vernon,” Imperial & Global Forum.

Claudia Sadowski-Smith, “The New Immigrant Whiteness: Race, Neoliberalism, and Post-Soviet Migration to the United States,” New Books Network.…

What We’re Reading This Week

Patient, Surrey County Lunatic Asylum (1850-58). The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

COLLIN BERNARD

Quinn Slobodian, “Trump, Populists and the Rise of Right-Wing Globalization,” The New York Times.

Seyla Benhabib, “Below the Asphalt Lies the Beach,” Boston Review.

Nadezhda Azhgikhina, “Russia’s Unlearned Lessons From the Failed Revolt of 1993,” The Nation.

Achin Vanaik, “India’s Two Hegemonies,” New Left Review.

MATTHEW BOWSER

Faisal Devji, “Jamal Khashoggi and the Competing Visions of Islam,” The New York Times.

“‘Iconic’ Image of Palestinian Protestor in Gaza Goes Viral,” Al Jazeera.

Tess Riley, “Just 100 Companies Responsible for 71% of Global Emissions, Study Says,” The Guardian.

“Episode 26: Cold War Legacies Roundtable,” Breaking History Podcast.

MARTIN CREVIER

Andrew Harry, “A Dead Sea Scrolls Forgery Casts Doubt on the Museum of the Bible Controversy,” The Atlantic.

Paige Raibmon, “Provincializing Europe in Canadian History; Or, How to Talk about Relations between Indigenous Peoples and Europeans,” Active History.

MEGHNA CHAUDHURI

Theodore Porter, “Madhouse Genetics,” Aeon.

Anne Schult, “Sovereignty, Property, and the Locus of Power,” JHI Blog.

Kate Wagner, “The Palace and the Storm,” The Baffler.

Kwame Anthony Appiah, “The Myth of Meritocracy: Who Really Gets What They Deserve?,” The Guardian.

DEXTER GOVAN

Soutik Biswas, “Delhi Smog: Foul Air Came from India’s Farming Revolution,” BBC.

Stephen Daker, “The Spectre of Militant,” New Socialist.

Matthew Engel, “A View From the Border: Ireland on the Brink of Brexit,” New Statesman.

Aditya Chakrabortty, “Britain Fell for a Neoliberal Con Trick – Even the IMF Says So,” The Guardian.

What We’re Reading This Week

Detail from John Singleton Copley, ‘The Death of Major Peirson, 6 January 1781’, (1783), The Tate. Creative Commons CC-BY-NC-ND.

YEHOR BRAILIAN

Livia Gershon, ‘The Problem With “Public Charge” Rules,’ JSTOR Daily.

Miles Larmer, ‘Global History for Schools,’ Historical Transactions.

Rachel Dinning, ‘”There Was No Feeling Sorry For Themselves”: Director Peter Jackson on the Soldiers of the First World War,’ Historyextra.

Podcast, ‘GHL Study Circle: Is Global History Facing A Crisis?,’ Global History Lab.

NATALIE BEHRENDS

Una Hadjari & Michael Colborne, ‘Why Ethnic Nationalism Still Rules Bosnia, and Why It Could Get Worse,’ The Nation.

Holland Cotter, ‘Brazil Enthralls With an Art Show of Afro-Atlantic History,’ The New York Times.

Adrien Daub, ‘The Return of the Face,’ Longreads.

Carrie Figdor & Robert Wilson, ‘The Eugenic Mind Project,’ New Books Network.

FATMA ALADAG

Issy Sawkins, ‘There Is Hope For Rohingya Refugees Fleeing Genocide,’ Imperial & Global Forum.

George Eaton, ‘Francis Fukuyama Interview: “Socialism Ought To Come Back,”‘ New Statesman.

Emile Chabal, ‘The Voice of Hobsbawm,’ Aeon.

SEAN PHILLIPS

Pankaj Mishra, ‘Gandhi for the Post-Truth Age,’ The New Yorker.

Yu-Shan Wu, Chris Alden & Cobus van Staden, ‘The Flawed Debate Around Africa’s China Debt and the Overlooked Agency of African Leaders,’ Quartz Africa.

Graham Bowley, ‘A New Museum Opens Old Wounds in Germany,’ The New York Times.…

CFP: Graduate Student Conference: Violence in a Connecting World (Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, March 21-22, 2019)

Interconnectedness and integration of the local into global networks of empire, capitalism, migration, religion, solidarity, and intellectual exchange are pervasive themes in the field of global history. Scholarship on global networks transcends methodological nationalism, problematizes nationalist histories, highlights syncretism and hybridity, and challenges Whiggish teleology. Cosmopolitanisms, transnational exchange, and global solidarity and activism are celebrated…

What We’re Reading This Week

Silvia Federici, Witches, Witch-Hunting, and Women (PM Press, 2018).

JAMES PARKER

Silvia Federici, “Witches, Witch-Hunting, and Women,” New Frame.

Yohannes Gedamu, “How Ethiopia’s History of Ethnic Rivalry is Destabilizing Its Reform Gains,” Quartz Africa.

Nicholas Grant, “Nelson Mandela and the Racial Politics of US Imperialism,” Africa is a Country.

Emily Baughan et. al, “History and Humanitarianism: A Conversation,” Past & Present.

KRISTIN OBERIANO

Anita Hofschneider, “Why Talking About Anti-Micronesian Hate Is Important,” Honolulu Civil Beat.

Kevin Nadal, “How I Learned What It Means To Be a Filipino-American,” BuzzFeed.

JOSEPH SATISH

Fatima Arkin, “The Ambassadors For Open Access Standards in the Global South,” SciDevNet.

J.N. Sinha, “Decline of an Observatory,” Frontline.

Ramya Tella, “Climate Justice and Gandhian Morality,” Economic & Political Weekly.

Cassandra Willyard, Megan Scudellari & Linda Nordling, “How Three Research Groups Are Tearing Down the Ivory Tower,” Nature.

CHRIS SZABLA

Stephen Sedley, “What To Do With the Kaiser?,” London Review of Books.

Emile Chabal, “The Voice of Hobsbawm,” Aeon.

Sergey Radchenko, “Stumbling Toward Armageddon,” The New York Times.

Gabriel Winant, “What We Do,” The Nation.