Category: The Daily

H-Net Review Publication: Wu on Gabaccia, 'Foreign Relations: American Immigration in Global Perspective'

Donna R. Gabaccia. Foreign Relations: American Immigration in Global Perspective. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012. 288 pp. $29.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-691-13419-2. Reviewed by Judy T. Wu (Ohio State University) Published on H-Diplo (October, 2013) Commissioned by Seth Offenbach Immigrant Foreign Relations In Foreign Relations: American Immigration in Global Perspective, Donna R. Gabaccia offers a bold new interpretation that brings diplomatic history…

Empires, bureaucracies and religion arise from war

Computer simulation shows that conflict fueled political consolidation in ancient and medieval history. War drove the formation of complex social institutions such as religions and bureaucracies, a study suggests. The institutions would have helped to maintain stability in large and ethnically diverse early societies. The study authors, who tested their theories in simulations and compared…

Visiting Scholar in World History at Pitt, 2014-2014

Visiting Scholar, 2014-2015. The World History Center at the University of Pittsburgh (www.worldhistory.pitt.edu<http://www.worldhistory.pitt.edu>) solicits applications for the position of Visiting Scholar with PhD for the academic year 2014-2015. The successful applicant will spend up to four months in residence at the World History Center and will receive up to US$ 12,000 of support, as research…

Some Reflections on the Nature of Global History

During the 1990s, when the term “global history” started becoming more popular within academic circles, quite a number of scholars expressed great reservations against this field. One of the most frequently articulated charges was that global history was destined to operate on a rather superficial level and would not be able to reach deeper than the realm of textbooks, trade books and introductory undergraduate courses. After all, many critics added, no serious scholar could possibly know a sufficient number of languages which would allow him or her to operate at a truly global level. Hence, the same logic went, global history could never evolve into a true research field which in the field of history, after all, is based on archival work and an intimate familiarity with primary sources on a distinct subject matter ((See for example O’Brien, Patrick K., “Historiographical Traditions and Modern Imperatives for the Restoration of Global History”, Journal of Global History, 1-1 (2006), pp. 3-39)).

In recent years, these debates have subsided, and the new great discussions on global history have moved on to different issues and themes. It is mainly distant outsiders remaining unfamiliar with the field’s most recent developments and trajectories who still pose the question whether global history can indeed evolve into an area of research. As a matter of fact, global history is being practiced by a growing, vibrant community of researchers. For them it is not primarily as a site of textbook production but rather an arena of genuine historical scholarship. This simple observation is evidenced by the sharply growing number of journal articles, research projects and monographs which in their title refer to “global history” or closely related terms ((See for example, Crossley, Pamela Kyle, What is Global History?, Cambridge: Polity, 2008)). In this context one may also refer to the founding of the Journal of Global History in 2006, and one may add that even earlier, in 1999, the American Historical Review introduced a review section focusing on “global and comparative” studies.

Announcing ‘The Great War and Global History’ conference, Oxford 9-10 January 2014

‘The Great War and Global History’ conference 9-10 January 2014 Maison Française, Oxford A two-day conference hosted by the Oxford Centre for Global History, Changing Character of War programme and Maison Française d’Oxford.  Convenors: Hew Strachan, James Belich, John Darwin  PLENARY SPEAKERS:  FINANCE Patrick O’Brien (LSE) ‘Warfare with Revolutionary and Napoleonic France and the Consolidation of…

CFP: 4th European Congress on World and Global History – Panel: Peripheral Port-Cities as Portals of Globalization

This panel on ‘Peripheral Port-Cities as Portals of Globalization’ is to take place at the 4th European Congress on World and Global History in Paris, 4-7 September 2014. The panel focuses on port-cities that once were relevant portals of globalization, but for one reason or another lost their appeal or saw their strategic centrality reduced…

Call for Reviewers: Itinerario, the International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction

Itinerario, the International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction (part of Cambridge University Press) is looking for reviewers for the following titles (see list below). Are any of you interested in reviewing the following books (list below) for the journal? A completed review, of approximately 1000 words, would be due to…

Workshop Announcement: Global Archivalities

May 7, 2013, 9-11 AM (PDT) Convenor: Randolph Head (UC-Riverside) Co-convenors: Arndt Brendecke (Munich), Hilde de Weerdt (London-King’s College) Attendance: In-person in Riverside, CA, or via Adobe Connect (globally) To participate: contact the convenor Archives play a fundamental role in historical research, yet archivality as a human cultural product subject to enormous variation – across…

Call for abstract submissions: Italy, Persia, and Early Modern Globalism

Please consider submitting an abstract for this session at the annual meeting of the College Art Association in Chicago in February 2014. Chicago, CAA Annual Conference, February 12 – 15, 2014 ITALY, PERSIA, AND EARLY MODERN GLOBALISM Cristelle Baskins, Tufts University, and Pamela Jones, UMass Boston Email: cristelle.baskins@tufts.edu or pamela.jones@umb.edu In late antiquity the eastern…