TPF Trustee Jeremy Adelman on the Future of Global History

In an article published today in Aeon magazine, TPF trustee Jeremy Adelman asks the question “What is Global History Now?” Reflecting on the future of global history, he wonders:

What is to become of this approach to the past, one that a short time ago promised to re-image a vintage discipline? What would global narratives look like in the age of an anti-global backlash? Does the rise of ‘America First’, ‘China First’, ‘India First’ and ‘Russia First’ mean that the dreams and work of globe-narrating historians were just a bender, a neo-liberal joyride?

Ultimately, Adelman presses for the continued need for global history, but one that is as attentive to disunity as it is to unity:

This does not make global history less pressing. On the contrary. One of the ironies is that the anti-globalism movement is immersed in transnational mutual adoration networks. The day after the Brexit plebiscite, Trump travelled to the UK to reopen his golf resort. The British had ‘taken back their country’, he told the bristle of microphones, then returned home to Make America Great Again. Le Pen’s excitement about Trump is well-known. Fyodor V Biryukov, head of Rodina, the Russian Motherland Party, calls this swarm ‘a new global revolution’. It was, we should recall, the global financial crisis of 2008-9 that did the most to ravage the hopes of one-world dreamers, emanating from the sector that had gone furthest to fuse Westerners and Resterners while creating deeper divides at home: banking.

In short, we need narratives of global life that reckon with disintegration as well as integration, the costs and not just the bounty of interdependence. They might not do well on the chirpy TED-talk circuit, compete with Friedman’s unbridled faith in borderless technocracy, or appeal much to Davos Man. But if we are going to come to terms with the deep histories of global transformations, we need to remind ourselves of one of the historian’s crafts, and listen to the other half of the globe, the tribalists out there and right here, talking back.

CFP: “The United States and Global Capitalism in the Twentieth Century,” (Fordham University, March 8th to 10th, 2018).

For scholars of the US in the world, see this call for papers for a conference on the histories of US foreign relations and global capitalism in the twentieth century:

Intense exchanges of people, goods, ideas, and capital occurred in tandem with the rise of American global power in the twentieth century. These transformations had great consequences in the United States and the world and have led historians to ask probing questions: In what ways and to what extent did global capitalism transform American lives and policy at home and abroad? How did American businesses understand opportunities abroad and the role of the U.S. government in facilitating their investments and profits? How did key American industries help shape international policies and what were the limits to their power? How did imperialism, warfare, decolonization, the Cold War, and development paradigms transform American perceptions about the relationship between the global capitalist economy and foreign relations? What were the origins and political trajectories of capitalist ideology that influenced U.S. foreign relations? How did capitalism as a social system affect how different groups of American citizens understood their place in the world?

To apply, send a 250-word abstract and 1-page CV to cdietrich2@fordham.edu  by March 31, 2017.

CFP: The Other Globalisers (Exeter, 6-7 July 2017)

For scholars interested in the role of socialist and non-aligned countries in the history of economic globalisation post-WWII, see this interesting call for papers for a conference at the University of Exeter from 6-7 July:

In the wake of the Second World War, the world economy began to ‘reglobalise’ – following the disintegrative processes of the interwar period. This story has most often been told as the final triumph of a neoliberal international order led by the West. Recent research, however, suggests that the creation of our modern interconnected world was not driven solely by the forces of Western capitalism, nor was it the only model of global economic interdependence that arose in the second half of the twentieth century. This conference aims to rethink the histories of postwar globalisation by focusing on the socialist and non-aligned world, whose roles in the rise of an economically interconnected world have received substantially less attention.

See the conference website for more information. Abstracts of 300-500 words and a short CV should be sent to Natalie Taylor (N.H.Taylor@exeter.ac.uk) by 18 March 2017.

CFP: In-Between Empires: Trans-imperial History in a Global Age (Freie Universität Berlin, September 15-16, 2017)

For readers interested in borderlands and other liminal imperial spaces of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, here’s an interesting call for papers for a conference to be held at the Freie Universität in Berlin in September:

 

By focusing on spaces “in-between” empires – their connectivity, cooperation, and competition – this workshop aims at establishing a trans-imperial approach to the history of empires.

Imperial history has been booming for quite a while. Along the way, innovative approaches such as post-colonial history, global history, or new imperial history have provided us with thrilling insights into the omnipresence and the everydayness of the human experience of empires. Amidst all this diversity, many studies have focussed on entanglements between colonies and metropoles, but much less is known about trans-imperial dimensions of the game. On an empirical basis, inter-imperial perspectives, which compare several empires or consider competition between them, have become more important lately. Yet, such studies are scattered and this kind of research remains in its infancy. We still lack an overarching theoretical-methodological framework with which to address the spaces in-between empires. In other words: whereas national history has been transnationalized in the past decades, the same does not hold true for the history of empires. Thus, we would like to address the current state of research and at the same time ask how a future trans-imperial history could look.

In this sense, we seek to decentralize the history of empires both on the level of empirical research and historiographical narratives. Our questions are as follows: do narratives for each empire change with such an approach? Do they appear less unique? To illustrate this: does the thesis about continuity in German colonialism from the late 19th century to the Nazi regime appear in another light if we discuss German expansion in trans-imperial contexts? Does the notion of the uniqueness of Japanese imperialism, which is often seen as a reaction to or even a mimicry of Western imperialism, still hold true? And, to add a final question: was the British empire the all-defining model for all the others or are the imperial processes of the various nations examples of mutual learning?

By discussing such concrete questions we also seek to address more overarching questions. How can we systemize such an approach in methodological and theoretical terms? Are recent concepts dealing with dissemination and practices of knowledge helpful? How can we integrate studies on anti-imperial agency or violence into the approach? And who were the brokers of trans-imperial interactions?

Research has shown that transnational approaches do not make the nation disappear. We would like to take the same stance in relation to empire. Therefore, in this workshop we will focus on specific cases. The workshop, to be held in Berlin in September 2017, will bring together an international group of scholars who have focused on one or more imperial dimensions of one of the following empires: British, French, Russian, Austria-Hungary, Japanese, German, Italian, Spanish, Ottoman, Chinese, as well as the US-American empire. Their contributions should discuss how transcending perspectives can change the perception of the empires they are specialized in, but also discuss possibilities and limits of a trans-imperial approach for the historiography per se. The focus will be on the years between 1850 and 1945. Possible topics include:

Trans-imperial learning, including different actors, such as intellectual or political elites and marginalized groups
Trans-imperial competition or the deliberate non-transfer of knowledge
Anti-imperial actors and their trans-imperial networks, actions, or conflicts
Empires at war and mutual learning in the context of colonial violence
Imperial interactions and the politics of comparison involved therein
Please note that we conceive of the Berlin workshop in September to be a ‘publication workshop’ – a workshop with relatively few but high-profile experts that enables not only in-depth discussion, but that will also result in a publication. More precisely, we intend to publish contributions based on papers (6000-7000 words) presented at the workshop in an edited volume in near future.

Travel and accommodation expenses of all participants will be paid by the organizers.

To apply, please submit a 250-300 word abstract by March 15 to the organizers at hedinger.daniel@gmail.com, nadin.hee@fu-berlin.de, and mizutanis0606@gmail.com).

 

CFP: Heritage Across Borders: Association of Critical Heritage Studies 4th Biennial Conference (Hangzhou, China, September 1-6 2018)

For readers interested in frontiers and borders, with a particular focus on heritage studies, here’s a call for papers for the 2018 Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference to be held in Hangzhou, China:

The global rise of heritage studies and the heritage industry in recent decades has been a story of crossing frontiers and transcending boundaries. The 2018 Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference, held in Hangzhou, China, thus takes ‘borders’ as a broadly defined, yet key, concept for better understanding how heritage is valued, preserved, politicised, mobilised, financed, planned and destroyed. Thinking through borders raises questions about theories of heritage, its methodologies of research, and where its boundaries lie with tourism, urban development, post-disaster recovery, collective identities, climate change, memory or violent conflict. Held in the city of Hangzhou, China, Heritage Across Borders will be the largest ever international conference in Asia dedicated to the topic of heritage. It has been conceived to connect international participants with local issues, and in so doing open up debates about the rural-urban, east-west, tangible-intangible and other familiar divides.

Borders tell us much about the complex role heritage plays in societies around the world today. Historically speaking, physical and political borders have led to ideas about enclosed cultures, and a language of cultural property and ownership which marches forward today in tension alongside ideals of universalism and the cosmopolitan. More people are moving across borders than ever before, with vastly different motivations and capacities. What role can heritage studies play in understanding the experiences of migrants or the plight of refugees? And what heritage futures do we need to anticipate as the pressures of international tourism seem to relentlessly grow year by year?

Heritage Across Borders will consider how the values of heritage and approaches to conservation change as objects, experts, and institutions move across frontiers. It will ask how new international cultural policies alter creation, performance, and transmission for artists, craftspersons, musicians, and tradition-bearers.

What are the frontiers of cultural memory in times of rapid transformation? How can museums engage with increasingly diverse audiences by blurring the distinctions between the affective and representational? And do digital reproductions cross important ethical boundaries?

One of the key contributions of critical heritage studies has been to draw attention to the role of heritage in constructing and operationalising boundaries and borders of many kinds-national, social, cultural, ethnic, economic and political. In what ways do international flows of capital rework indigenous and urban cultures, and reshape nature in ways that redefine existing boundaries?

We especially welcome papers that challenge disciplinary boundaries and professional divides, and explore cross-border dialogues. What lessons can be learned from Asia where the distinctions between the tangible and intangible are less well marked? And how can researchers bridge cultural and linguistic barriers to better understand these nuances?

Organised by Zhejiang University this major international conference will be held in Hangzhou, China on 1-6 September 2018. We welcome session proposals which address the conference theme of boundaries and borders, and cluster around the following suggested sub-themes:

Subthemes:
Heritage Trafficking

Negotiating linguistic borders

Heritage and human/non-human relations

Museums challenging boundaries

Crossing the indigenous/non-indigenous divide

The heritage of diaspora and refugees

The planned and unplanned spaces of heritage

Boundaries of digital reproduction

Memory and forgetting

Geographies of Craft

Asia and the world

Extraterritorial heritage

Heritage across disciplines

Nations, Regions, Territories

Theorising heritage as border

Tangible and intangible

Connecting the rural and urban

China and the region (One Belt One road)

Cross cultural methodologies

Nature-cultures

Cross border conflicts and cooperation

Bridging practice and academia

Past/present/future

Gender and heritage

Regular Sessions will be allocated one or more standard blocks of 1.5 hours, which will usually consist of four papers of 20 minutes duration (normally 15 minutes for each paper with 5 minutes following each paper for discussion and the remaining ten minutes in each block used for introductory and concluding remarks). Proposals for regular sessions should include the following details:
session type (i.e. regular session);

a session title;

the names, affiliations and contact details of one or more session organisers/co-organisers;

up to 300 word session abstract;

a list of confirmed speakers, contact details and paper titles;

an indication of whether the session will be closed or open to advertisement for further participation via the conference website when we call for individual paper submissions.

Panel Discussions will be allocated a standard block of 1.5 hours and will normally consist of a discussion amongst a group of 4-5 panellists around a specific set of questions or themes. Proposals for panel discussions should include the following details:
session type (i.e. panel discussion);

a panel title;

the names, affiliations and contact details of one or more panel session organisers/co-organisers;

up to 300 word panel session abstract;

a list of 4-5 confirmed speakers and their affiliations and contact details.

Please send your session proposals to the following email address: 2018achs@zju.edu.cn by the 31st of March, 2017.

For more information, visit the conference website: http://www.2018achs.com/#/.

CFP: Rethinking the World Order: International Law and International Relations at the End of the First World War (Oxford, 31 August – 1 September 2017)

For readers working at the intersection of international law and international relations, here’s a thought-provoking call for applications. The workshop is being convened by the European Studies Centre (ESC) at St Antony’s College, Oxford from 31 August to 1 September 2017:

The horrors of the Great War and the desire for peace shaped scholarship in International Law and International Relations (IR) during the late 1910s—a stimulating time for both disciplines. Scholars observed and analysed political events as they unfolded but also took an active part, as governmental advisors or diplomatic officials, in devising the new international order. The Paris Peace Conference and the subsequent birth of the League of Nations as well as the Permanent Court of International Justice served as testing grounds for new legal and political concepts. The end of the First World War was in many ways a milestone for both disciplines, prompting scholars to reflect on the consequences of the war on society, politics, and the world economy. How could another world war be avoided in the future? How could states be held accountable for violations of international law? What were the preconditions for peaceful international governance? These questions led to pioneering research on issues such as arbitration, sanctions, revision of treaties, supra-national governance, disarmament, self-determination, migration, and the protection of minorities. At the same time, the study of International Law and IR also advanced in terms of methodology and teaching, including new professorships, journals, conferences and research centres.

A century later, it is a good moment to reflect upon disciplinary histories and revisit some of the theoretical and practical debates that shaped the period from 1914 to 1945. The workshop conveners are particularly (but not exclusively) interested in the following research questions:

Was the First World War a watershed moment for the development of International Law and IR?
Which were the key debates in both disciplines? And how can they be re-interpreted today?
What were the connections and/or dividing lines between the two disciplines?
Did International Law and IR evolve similarly across different countries?
Who were the principle actors, both individuals and institutions, in the respective fields?
Which role did International Law and IR respectively play in shaping ‘real-world’ policy? And to what extent were theoretical developments shaped by political events?
How did ideas float between academia and politics?
How successful were non-governmental organisations—such as academic societies, arbitration clubs, political pressure groups, League of Nations clubs, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), etc.—in achieving their goals?
The two-day interdisciplinary workshop will be held at the European Studies Centre (ESC) at St Antony’s College, Oxford from 31 August to 1 September 2017. We invite abstracts from early career researchers and advanced postgraduate students in history, law, IR and other related disciplines to share their research in a multi-disciplinary environment. By facilitating this exchange we hope to open new avenues of research and to encourage new approaches to the history of both disciplines. We are planning to have six panels, one keynote address, and an open plenary session that allows all participants to pitch their research projects.

Interested early career researchers and advanced postgraduate students in history, law, IR and other related disciplines should submit their proposal (including a title, 300 words abstract, and a short bio) to Jan Stöckmann at jan.stoeckmann@new.ox.ac.uk by 31 March 2017.

Postdoctoral Fellowships, Clements Center for National Security, University of Texas Austin

On the job market or in search of a post-doctoral fellowship? Here are several recently published opportunity from the Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas at Austin:

Clements Center Postdoctoral Fellowship

The Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas at Austin seeks applications from recent PhD recipients for its Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

Consistent with the Clements Center’s mission areas of history, strategy, and statecraft, applicants from all disciplines whose research bears directly on foreign and defense policy, intelligence, or international security are welcome to apply. However, strong preference will be given to applicants with a doctorate in history or whose research has a strong historical component (ancient or modern). Successful applicants will be able to spend the substantial portion of their time working on their own research and writing projects, while taking advantage of the many academic resources available at the University of Texas-Austin. Additionally, Fellows will be required to play an active role in the Clements Center’s programs and activities; any specific responsibilities will be by mutual agreement between the Fellow and the Clements Center leadership. Fellows accepted to the program will be offered a competitive stipend, full use of UT facilities, and office space at the Clements Center. In some cases Fellows will be welcome to teach a course at the University of Texas. Each appointment is for one year, and in exceptional cases may be considered for renewal for a second year.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Intelligence Studies

The Intelligence Studies Project (ISP) of the Clements Center for National Security and the Strauss Center for International Security and Law will grant a postdoctoral fellowship in intelligence studies to a promising young scholar. This unique fellowship is intended to support the next generation of scholars and educators in the field of intelligence.

Applicants from all disciplines whose research bears on national security intelligence are welcome to apply. The successful applicant will be expected to work on research and writing projects of their own design, while taking advantage of the academic resources available at the University of Texas-Austin.  The Fellow will be expected to play an active role in programs and activities organized by the ISP, Clements and Strauss centers.  Any specific responsibilities will be by mutual agreement between the Fellow and the ISP Director. The Fellow accepted for this program will be offered a competitive stipend, full use of UT facilities, and workspace. Depending upon qualifications and interest, the Fellow may have the opportunity to teach a course at UT-Austin. The fellowship appointment is for one year, but in an exceptional case may be renewed for a second year.

Interested? Further information is available here. Please note that applications are due by March 3, 2017 for the former position and March 1, 2017 for the latter position in Intelligence Studies; however, as the announcement notes, applicants receive their doctorate by August 2017 to be eligible for appointment.

Predoctoral fellowships, Yale University

Enrolled in a PhD program and working on a doctoral dissertation in the areas of history, political science, or related disciplines? Yale University is advertising two predoctoral fellowships: the Smith Richardson Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship in International History, and the Henry A. Kissinger Predoctoral Fellowship.  Applications are due 15 March 2017. For more information, follow the links above.

CFP: International Workshop on Changes and Continuities: Global History, Visual Culture and Itinerancies (Lisbon, Sept 14-16, 2017)

Readers working at the interface of cultural studies and global history will be excited to participate in this upcoming event  in Lisbon (Portugal) in September 2017. This event follows the success of two previous workshops in 2014 and 2015, and focuses on the interconnections between global history and visual culture. The workshop is organized by the Institute of Medieval Studies, the Portuguese Centre for Global History, the Institute of Contemporary  History and the Institute of Art History and will take place at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Nova University of Lisbon) from September 14-16, 2017.  The call for papers from the organizers provides the following details:

Following the Ist (2014) and IInd (2015) International Workshops “Changes and continuities”, the Institute of Medieval Studies, the Portuguese Centre for Global History, the Institute of Contemporary  History and the Institute of Art History, will organize the IIIrd Workshop entitled “Changes and Continuities. Global History, Visual Culture and Itinerancies”, to be held at the FCSH-UNL (September 14-16, 2017). The MeC3 will focus on three main research lines. All proposals will be distributed in one of them, under an interdisciplinary and trans-historical frame. Thus, the MeC3 accepts proposals relating to the following topics:
 
1. Global History – One of the main challenges that History has to face is globalization. National studies have demonstrated their incapability to correctly understand global phenomena, and the way in which they affect societies. This is why new parameters of study are needed. In this thematic line, the methodological and theoretical issues -in addition to the strictly historical one- will be studied n terms of globalization, from its origins, to its development and its present. Proposals may focus on the following subjects (not exclusively): comparative studies, evolution of global phenomena, historical processes in their diachrony, regional studies, changing economies, cultural continuities, methodological questions on globalization, etc.
 
2. Visual Culture – The insertion of Visual Culture in the theoretical methodology of Global History responds to the need to vindicate interdisciplinary. Through this theoretical approach, it will be possible to build a place of convergence for the different areas of Humanities; with the ultimate aim of creating a space for dialogue between the concepts of “Global History” and “Visual Culture”.
Only then we would be authorized to act through a “cultural visuality”. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of cultural interaction -underlining the process- remains an important problem, because the construction and deconstruction of Visual Global History is still taking place today. Therefore, rather than the study of images it is the study of the social life of images that will make sense.
Proposals may focus on the following subjects (not exclusively): traveling images, borders and images, social life of images, Visual Culture in Global History, theoretical sources for the study of the itinerant images; aesthetics of migration.
 
3. Itinerancies – One of the fundamental characteristics of Global History is interconnection. All human beings interact with each other, either passively or actively. In this context, one of the most relevant parameters of change emerges: the itinerancy of culture and knowledge. Therefore, itinerant agents take with them a cultural baggage, transporting and transmitting it to other spaces. In this way, the interconnection begins, producing active changes in Global History and Visual Culture. The relevance of the concept is due to the fact that it covers different areas of action: people who act as itinerant agents; materials that are brought in and taken away (traveling objects); origin and reception places of itinerant elements (anthropology of itinerancy); the visual, artistic or written representation of the phenomenon of itinerancy.
 
This Workshop aims to bring together researchers from different chronological periods, at different stages of their research, and to work on the themes indicated above. To submit a proposal you must complete the form available at http://3wimec.blogspot.pt/ until March 31, 2017. Abstracts and a short biography should contain a maximum of 300 words each.
 
Proposals may be in Portuguese, Spanish, English, French or Italian.
 
The Workshop includes the payment of a registration fee of € 20 for students and € 30 for researchers who submit a communication.
If you are interested in the above call, you will have to submit your abstract by March 31 2017 to Jorge Tomás García (jgarcia@fcsh.unl.pt). You can get further details on the workshop here.

 

CFP: The 9/11 Legacy: “History is Not Was, History Is” (New York City, June 15-16, 2017)

For scholars of the US in the world,  here’s a call for papers on the legacies of 9/11 to be held on the former site of the World Trade Center itself:

This conference to be held at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum on the former World Trade Center site will explore the broader legacy of 9/11. We seek panel and paper proposals – both traditional and novel, empirical and conceptual – that consider the myriad ways that the events of September 11, 2001, continue to inform the past, the present and the future: both in the United States and around the world.

This was the most globally witnessed event in history and one that led to the longest war in the history of the United States. What, then, are the legacies that ripple out from the memorial fountains here in lower Manhattan across the city, the country, and the globe? As William Faulkner observed, “History is not was, history is.” How has the event of “9/11” reverberated in our understanding of the past and in more contemporary social, political, and cultural life; in the economy, in war and peace, surveillance and security, the geopolitics of the Middle East, the refugee crisis and in the debates over identity, memory and sacred space? What historical processes might we trace – either backwards or forwards – from September 11, 2001? What news headlines can we connect to 9/11 in meaningful and instructive ways: Paris, Orlando, Istanbul, the Arab Spring, Aleppo, the death of Syrian refugee child Alan Kurdi, Edward Snowden, Russia, the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the list goes on…

We welcome proposals that consider the ways in which, to quote Mark Redfield in The Rhetoric of Terror, a “new history begins here at this calendrical ground zero.”

Topics might include (but are not limited to):

9/11 and historiography
9/11 and periodization
Memory and memorialization
Sacred and contested spaces
“America in the world”
The conflicts in the Middle East and South Asia
Acts of terror around the globe since 9/11
The changing face of terrorism
The changing face of warfare and nation-building
Intelligence, surveillance and counter-terrorism
Para-legality, states of exception and rendition
Nationalism, identity, “self “and “other”
Human rights, civil liberties and conceptions of “freedom”
Shifts in cultural production and representation since 9/11
The media, social media and the “image” of terror
The academy, museums and cultural institutions
The return of religion
The refugee crisis
Discussions of time and space; home and homeland
We especially seek interdisciplinary panel and paper proposals that draw on the intersections between these topics and themes in order to explore the ways in which they might (or might not be) traced back to, or through, 9/11. Do they have a narrative coherence shaped by the forces created that day in September? Or do they operate outside the event, as part of some other inevitable geopolitical shift that we now know only by that name-date even if that shift might have happened anyway?

Scholars, practitioners, curators, graduate students and other professionals are all encouraged to submit paper and panel proposals. To apply, send an abstract of less than 300 words and a CV to 2017conference@911memorial.org. Applications are due April 1, 2017.