Jason Ralph Receives Economic and Social Research Council Funding

Jason Ralph has been awarded some funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (UK) to pursue his research project: “Law, War and the State of American Exception.”

The central question driving the proposed research is whether the post-9/11 exception has now become the norm in US security policy and what this means for English School (ES) understandings of war as an institution of international society. Two articles and a book on the subject are forthcoming from Global Society, Review of International Studies, and Edinburgh University Press, respectively.

"1989 in a Global Perspective" Conference

There is an upcoming conference entitled “1989 in a Global Perspective” which will be held at the University of Leipzig, Germany from October 14 to 16, 2009. “This conference is meant as a contribution not only to the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and revolutions in Eastern Europe in 1989, but also to the 600th anniversary of Leipzig University. Since Leipzig has a long established tradition in the discussion about problems of universal and global history we decided to focus on the global dimension and to gather scholars who have excelled in the study of dynamics and entanglements of world regions.”

The conference is being held in conjunction with the Global and European Studies Institute (GESI), the Centre for the History and Culture of East-Central Europe (GWZO), the European Network in Universal and Global History (ENIUGH) and the Graduate Centre for the Humanities and Social Sciences of the Research Academy Leipzig. It is sponsored by the Bundesstiftung zur Aufarbeitung der SED-Diktatur and the University of Leipzig.

"Writing the History of the Global: Challenges for the 21st Century" Conference

From May 21 to 22 of 2009 there will be a conference hosted at the British Academy entitled “Writing the History of the Global: Challenges for the 21st Century.” The conference will feature a great lineup of thinkers.

According to the conference description: “Debates over ‘globalization’ and paradigms such as the ‘great divergence’ stimulated historians in many specialisms to think about the historical formation of these phenomena. Just how unique, how distinctive, is our current condition of an intense interlinking of economies and polities. We are now re-thinking our histories in relation to those of others in wider parts of the world.”

New Global History: An Introduction

Profs Akira Iriye (Harvard) and Bruce Mazlish (MIT)

What are the forces of globalization shaping our world (for better or for worse)? How can we bring an historical perspective to bear on them? How might we conceptualize a new sub-field of history-global history-and distinguish it from more traditional historical and world historical approaches? When did the forces that we associate with globalization become apparent, and how have these forces evolved since then to shape the contemporary world? Are we, in fact, entering a global epoch? This course is an inquiry into such questions, and into the materials relating to them, dealing specifically with transnational factors such as the step into space, satellite communications, the multinational corporations, migrations, environmental issues, international relations, and human rights; and with topics such as global culture, consumerism, and cities.

Download Syllabus (Adobe PDF Format)