Professor of International Studies with a Specialization in Global History at Leiden University

The Leiden University Institute for History is seeking applications for  a full professor of International Studies with a specialization in Global History.

From the announcement:

The successful applicant will especially contribute to the BA / MA programmes in International Studies, and other programs and courses as required. (S)he will hold an appointment at the Leiden University Institute for History and will be based in The Hague and Leiden.

  • Original research involving primary sources within the broad framework of ‘Global History’;
  • Teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, in lecture and seminar formats; primarily in International Studies BA and MA programs;
  • Initiation and supervision of postgraduate research;
  • Acquisition of project funding at the national, European and international level;
  • Contribution to administration on various levels of academic leadership;
  • Representation of the field to external audiences and media.

Selection criteria

We seek a scholar of wide intellectual scope. Specialization in terms of region and themes is open, but we are particularly interested in candidates with a demonstrable transnational perspective in research and teaching, who focuses on contemporary, i.e. post-1945, global history.

We expect the successful candidate to have:

  • Excellent research qualities, visible in a PhD degree (preferably in History) and a high-quality, internationally acces­sible re­search and publication record;
  • Demonstrable commitment to high-quality teaching practice, and broad teaching scope and thesis supervision;
  • Disciplinary expertise in History, openness to interdisciplinary cooperation; and the ability to integrate his/her disciplinary knowledge with regional-historical perspectives;
  • Ability to acquire funding for and manage international research projects;
  • Demonstrated administrative, management and leadership abilities;
  • An excellent command of English. If the successful candidate is not Dutch-speaking, s/he is expected to have acquired a good command of Dutch within two years from taking up duty. The Faculty will make resources available to this end.

About our faculty and institute

The Faculty of Humanities is rich in expertise in fields as philosophy, history, art history, arts, literature, linguistics, religion studies and regional studies covering nearly every region of the world. Located in the historical centre of Leiden, our faculty is home to more than 5400 students and 800 staff members. It offers an inspiring and international work environment. For more information, see http://www.hum.leidenuniv.nl.

Institute for History

The Leiden Institute for History is one of the seven research institutes of the Faculty of Humanities. The Institute was ranked 28th among history departments in the 2014 QS World University Ranking. The Institute’s strong international orientation and focus on the study of European, American, Asian and African societies in a global context gives the Institute its unique character. For more information see http://www.hum.leiden.edu/history

‘International Studies’ is a new programme which studies the political, cultural, historical and economic developments in various regions of the world, in their mutual dependence. International Studies started in September 2012, and it attracts a wide, international student body. The programme consists of a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree and is taught in English. The BA programme is housed in The Hague; the MA programme is based in Leiden. For more information see http://www.bachelors.leiden.edu/studies/info/international-studies and http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/international-studies/en/programme

Terms and conditions

The successful candidate is eligible for a permanent, fulltime appointment (38 hrs per week), provided his or her suitability is determined on the basis of previous experience as a full professor, and provided s/he has successfully completed a tenure track. In other cases an appointment is initially for a period of five years, convertible into a permanent position pending satisfactory performance. The preferred appointment date is August 1, 2015.

The gross monthly salary is set on € 5.003,- to 7.285 per month, commensurate with qualifications and based upon a fulltime employment and in conformity with current salary scales under the collective employment agreement (CAO) for Dutch Universities. Leiden University offers an attractive benefits package with additional holiday (8%) and end-of-year bonuses(8.3 %), training and career development and sabbatical leave. Our individual choices model gives you some freedom to assemble your own set of terms and conditions. Candidates from outside the Netherlands may be eligible for a substantial tax break.

Procedure

The candidate will be asked to give a lecture as part of the application procedure, and may be required to participate in a management assessment.

Information

Queries to Prof. Wim van den Doel, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities (h.w.van.den.doel@hum.leidenuniv.nl), with cc. to Prof. André Gerrits (a.w.m.gerrits@hum.leidenuniv.nl), chair of the International Studies degree.

Applications

Applications should be in English, and electronically be submitted in a PDF-document, named ‘Family name – given name – vacancy number’. This document should include, in this order:

  • CV including education and employment history, publications, courses devised / taught (including assessments), grant and awards, and linguistic capabilities;
  • A letter of motivation including a personal vision of International Studies with a specialization in Global History within the context of International Studies (2 pages max.);
  • Names, positions and email addresses of three referees (no reference letters);
  • A research agenda including titles and outlines of (potential) individual or team projects (2 pages max.)
  • A teaching statement relevant to International Studies at BA and MA level (2 pages max.).

Please submit your application (with the vacancy number mentioned in the letter of motivation and in the subject line of the e-mail) before December 15, 2014, to Leerstoelen@hum.leidenuniv.nl

Vacancy number: 14-301

Assistant Professor in Global History at the Memorial University of Newfoundland

The Department of History at the Memorial University of Newfoundland is seeking applications for an Assistant Professor in Global History which will commence on July 1, 2015. The application deadline is December 15, 2014, and interested applicants should visit the application announcement.

From the announcement:

Our department currently has a full-time complement of 15 and this position is one of three additional positions we are seeking to fill this academic year. Memorial University has an excellent research library and is home to the Maritime History Archive, the largest collection of merchant marine records in the world.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching and supervision. Conditions of employment are governed by the collective agreement available at www.mun.ca/munfa. Applicants are expected to hold a PhD degree in a relevant field by the time of appointment. If a successful candidate has not completed an earned doctorate, he/she shall be appointed to a regular term, non-renewable three-year appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor. If the candidate completes all the requirements for the doctorate during the first 24 months of the term appointment, he/she shall begin a tenure-track appointment following completion of the requirements of the degree.

Applicants are requested to send a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a statement of current and future research interests, a teaching dossier, a writing sample, and three letters of reference to Prof. Terry Bishop Stirling, Head, Department of History, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada, A1C 5S7; Fax: (709) 864-2164; e-mail: tstirlin@mun.ca. More information about this job opportunity can be found here.

New Atlas of Global History Institutions

Followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation will recall that we unveiled this current version of our website this autumn after extensive revision and collaboration with the fantastic staff at George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Along with that re-design has come new features, like our periodical Interviews with Global Historians.

As we continue to expand the site’s functionality, we’re happy to announce a new page–an “atlas” of global history institutions that you can either find here or via the drop-down menu under “Participate,” in the top-right hand corner of your browser window.

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“Development and Underdevelopment in Postwar Europe” (Columbia University) Conference Report

It’s no secret that one of the most booming sub-disciplines in international and global history today is the history of development–the interaction of the rich world with the poor world before (but especially after) empire, in the hopes that poor societies could be “developed” into something better. Works like Michael Latham’s Modernization as Ideology, Nick Cullather’s The Hungry World, and Matthew Connelley’s Fatal Misconception have explored aspects of this story from the lens of U.S. foreign policy, food aid, and population control, respectively, and works on development from non-American perspectives (the Soviet Union or Yugoslavia) or new themes, like smallpox control, seem to be sprouting up every day.

A recent conference hosted by the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University and organized by Professors Michele Alacevich (Loyola), Sandrine Kott (Geneva), and Mark Mazower (Columbia) sought to shake up the conversation surrounding development. Here follows a short round-up of the conference–summaries of the eight or so papers presented, plus the keynote address delivered by historian Adam Tooze, soon to be a guest himself on the Global History Forum.

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Harvard Magazine Article Explores Global History Today

Followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation’s activities will be interested to know that there’s an excellent in-depth feature article in Harvard Magazine–an independent journal founded by Crimson alumni–covering the state of global history today, at least through the lens of activities in Cambridge.

The piece covers the work of several global historians today: Sven Beckert and Charles S. Maier, co-directors of the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History at Harvard; Julia McClure, a historian of the early modern Atlantic space who was a post-doc at Harvard last year before beginning a new post-doctoral position at the European University Institute in Italy this year; Harvard professor Michael McCormick, a historian of the Middle Ages whose work has incorporated perspectives from soil science and epidemiology; and Sengalese historian Omar Gueye, professor at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar.

“Historians increasingly recognize that trying to understand the past solely within the confines of national boundaries misses much of the story,” explains the piece.

Perhaps the integration of today’s world has fostered a renewed appreciation for global connections in the past. Historians now see that the same patterns—colonialism, or the rise of small elites controlling vast resources—emerge across cultures worldwide through time, and they are trying to explain why. “If there is one big meta-trend within history, it is this turn toward the global,” says [Sven Beckert]. “History looks very different if you don’t take a particular nation-state as the starting point of all your investigations.

Congratulations to the historians whose work is featured in the article!

Call for Applications: Global Humanitarianism Research Academy

We’re pleased to re-post a recent call for applications from the Global Humanitarianism Research Academy (GHRA), a wonderful opportunity for both PhDs and early post-docs working on the history of humanitarianism to get together for two weeks in Mainz (Germany) and Geneva to share their work and discuss research agendas and publishing strategies. The GHRA, reads the call,

combines academic sessions at the Leibniz Institute of European History in Mainz and the Imperial and Global History Centre at the University of Exeter with archival sessions at the Archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva. The Research Academy addresses early career researchers who are working in the related fields of humanitarianisminternational humanitarian lawpeace and conflict studies as well as human rights covering the period from the 18th to the 20th century. It supports scholarship on the ideas and practices of humanitarianism in the context of international, imperial and global history thus advancing our understanding of global governance in humanitarian crises of the present.”

The initiative is supported by the University of Exeter, the Leibniz-Institut für Europäische Geschichte in Mainz, the Deutsches Historisches Institut London, and the International Committee of the Red Cross. Ten days of intense discussions and fellowship-supported archival work, taking place from July 13-July 24: it doesn’t get much better than this. (Those unable to fit in this year’s program into their schedule may wish to note that next year’s session will be hosted by Exeter, in the UK.)

Applicants are requested to send a cover letter, a draft article, a statement of their research project, a CV, and two letters of recommendation to ghra@ieg-mainz.de no later than December 31, 2014. More information is available via the full call for papers, available here.

Toynbee Prize Foundation Trustee Publishes “The History Manifesto”

Toynbee Prize Foundation Trustee David Armitage (Harvard University) has recently authored a short tract with fellow historian of Britain Jo Guildi (Brown),  provocatively titled The History Manifesto. “How should historians speak truth to power–and why does it matter?” ask the authors.

Why is five hundred years better than five months or five years as a planning horizon? And why is history – especially long-term history – so essential to understanding the multiple pasts which gave rise to our conflicted present? The History Manifesto is a call to arms to historians and everyone interested in the role of history in contemporary society.

Armitage and Guildi go on to “identify a recent shift back to longer-term narratives, following many decades of increasing specialization, which they argue is vital for the future of historical scholarship and how it is communicated.” A changing of temporal horizons, they urge, is crucial, if historians hope to address big themes like global warming, public health, or development–themes that are all especially amenable to a global history approach.

Interested readers can read the open-access manifesto or join the debate at the book’s website here.

Toynbee Prize Foundation Leadership Featured in New York Review of Books

In the most recent issue of The New York Review of Books, Tamsin Shaw reviews Toynbee Prize Foundation Vice-President Darrin McMahon’s most recent work,  Divine Fury: A History of Genius (New York: Basic Books, 2013).

“Darrin McMahon’s Divine Fury,” writes Shaw:

does not shy away from the preposterous and the ridiculous, or from the disturbing and dangerous. Many of us now use the term “genius” as a simple expression of wonder, referring to a person or an achievement that we find inexplicably brilliant. But as McMahon’s rich narrative shows, across its long history the term has accrued connotations that go far beyond this commonsense core, leading us into the realms of superstition, bad science, and subservience to questionable forms of authority. And yet his book ends on an unexpected note of regret that “genius” in the most extravagant sense of the term has given way to more trivial uses, to a culture in which everyone has a genius for something and where even infants might be “baby Einsteins.” The cult of the “great exception,” the unfathomably and inimitably great human being, he tells us, has justifiably waned. Nevertheless, McMahon’s closing words are elegiac, hinting that its loss might somehow diminish us.
In his intriguing story not only is the age of genius dead; the seeds of its destruction were sown very early on. The term “genius” in its modern sense was first adopted in the eighteenth century and it involved a conflation of two Latin terms: genius, which for the Romans was the god of our conception, imbuing us with particular personality traits but nevertheless a supernatural force external to us, and ingenium, a related noun referring to our internal dispositions and talents, our inborn nature. McMahon also details the associations that these ideas had derived from the Greek world, particularly from speculation about the Socratic daimonion, the Platonic idea that poetry is the product of a “divine madness,” and the Aristotelian view that there are fundamental differences between minds.

Call for Papers: “Trafficking, Smuggling, and Illicit Migration in Historical Perspective”

A group of scholars from the Birkbeck (University of London), Sydney, and Texas Tech have recently announced a conference on the history of trafficking, smuggling, and illicit migration to take place at Birkbeck from June 18-20, 2015 – a great chance for a field that necessarily invokes global themes to coalesce more and for scholars to develop international connections.  “Human trafficking, human smuggling, and illicit migration,” write the conference organizers,

are some of the most politically volatile and pressing issues in the present day. They are also the subject of a growing amount of sociological, criminological, and historical research. This combined conference and workshop aims to bring together the growing number of scholars who are currently working on the histories of trafficking, smuggling, and illicit and sexual migration from all regions in the modern period. In particular, it aims to critically engage with the concept of sexual trafficking in the past by exploring the way in which it was entangled with labour and with migration more broadly. Papers need not be limited, therefore, to the subject of trafficking: we encourage submissions from those working on smuggling and illicit migration as well, though we are especially interested in work from a gendered perspective.

It promises to be a rich discussion. The conference organizers request that proposals for papers (300-500 words) and expressions of interest in the workshop (150-200 words) be sent to traffickinghistoryconference@gmail.com no later than October 1, 2014.

International Research Award in Global History 2015

Here’s an exciting opportunity for post-doctoral scholars of global history, advertised jointly by the Universities of Heidelberg, Sydney, and Basel. Scholars are invited to propose and organize a conference on global history, to be hosted by the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität in Heidelberg in December 2015. The three participating institutions will make available a purse of €10,000 to help defray the invitees to the conference.

This is a wonderful opportunity for early-career scholars seeking to establish themselves, not to mention an excellent chance for the further development of global history as a field. Applications are due November 30, 2014.

The announcement follows:

The Universities of Heidelberg, Basel and Sydney are proud to announce the International Research Award in Global History, to be awarded for the first time in 2015. The successful applicant will receive up to €10,000 towards the organization of an international symposium on a topic of his/her choice at one of the participating institutions. 
Global History is still a comparatively young research field. Over the last two decades it has emerged as an important sub-discipline in the broader field of historical research, encompassing a wide range of methodological and thematic approaches, including transnational, international and world history. The International Research Award in Global History and the award symposium has been initiated jointly by some of the leading researchers in the field, in order to identify innovative young researchers in this broad field. The award will further their work by giving them the intellectual freedom and the financial means to bring together scholars from all over the world to engage with a topic of their own choice and design. Our aim is to make the scholarly work of the awardee visible in the scientific community and put them in closer contact with established colleagues in their field. Beyond supporting the research and academic networks of the prize-winning scholar, the award symposium will contribute to the field’s ability to critically reflect and intellectually replenish itself. The award also aims to reach out to an academic public beyond the sub-discipline of global history and provide a broader stage for the pioneering research currently undertaken in the field. 
The purse of up to €10,000 attached to the award will be used to host an international symposium on a topic proposed by the successful applicant. In 2015, the symposium will take place at Heidelberg University in Germany, on 4-5 December. It will be the awardee’s responsibility to organize the panels and invite the speakers for the symposium. Chairs and discussants will come from the initiating institutions at Basel, Heidelberg and Sydney and the award jury. Organizational support will be available. 
The International Research Award in Global History is jointly advertised by the Department of History and the Cluster of Excellence ‘Asia and Europe in a Global Context’ at Heidelberg University (Roland Wenzlhuemer), the Institute for European Global Studies at the University of Basel (Madeleine Herren-Oesch) and the Laureate Research Program in International History at the University of Sydney (Glenda Sluga). The award jury will be comprised of the organizers, as well as Marcel van der Linden (Amsterdam), Tamson Pietsch (Brunel/Sydney) and Peer Vries (Vienna). 
Typically, applicants will have recently completed their doctoral studies and be in the early stages of their postdoctoral career in History. However, a doctorate is not a formal requirement. Applicants should submit a cover letter explaining their interest in the award (max. 2 pages), an academic CV and their proposal for the award symposium (detailing the topic, a tentative list of participants and a preliminary budget, max. 5 pages) electronically to susanne.hohler@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de (as one PDF file) by November 30, 2014.