Peter J. Fraam Fellowship in Global Wellbeing (Merton College, Oxford)

Here’s a recent fellowship announcement that may be of interest to readers: Merton College, a constituent College at the University of Oxford,

proposes to elect a Peter J Braam Research Fellow in Global Wellbeing for three years commencing on 1 October 2015 or as soon as possible thereafter. This is a career development post which will provide a promising academic with opportunities to develop as researcher.
The main duty of the post will be to undertake independent research in a topic contributing to the solution of the most pressing global welfare problems facing the human race, such as research into the application of technology to development challenges including health, growing inequality and the lack of social cohesion, or instability in globalisation (cyber threats, collapsing financial structures).
The postholder will be eligible for election as a Fellow of the College. The Fellow will be entitled to free meals, medical insurance, research expenses and other benefits.

More information can be found at the Call for Particulars; applications are due via an online application form by March 9, 2015.

Assistant/Associate Professor in World and Global History, University of Macau

The University of Macau has advertised a tenure-track position for an Assistant or Associate Professor of World and Global History, expected to begin in August 2015. “Applicants,” the call explains,

Applicants should have a PhD in hand by the time of employment and some teaching experience, and should specialize in one or more of the following research and teaching areas: Ancient/Modern/Contemporary European-Asian Relations, and related areas of the History of Europe, South, Southeast or East Asia. The successful candidate may be required to teach General Education courses in Global Issues in History and Culture. Command of at least one European or Asian language (in addition to English), relevant to her/his area of specialization, may be considered an advantage.

Applicants are invited to visit the University’s vacancies site for more information; to apply online, they should use its job application portal. (The reference number for this position is: FSS/DHIST/WH/01/2015).

The review of applications will commence on March 1, 2015, so make sure to submit your application by then! Finalists will be invited for interviews. Hence, “applicants,” notes the posting, “may consider their applications not successful if they were not invited for an interview within 3 months of application.”

University of Pittsburgh, Postdoctoral Fellowship in World History

Our colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh have advertised a neat post-doctoral position in World History that should attract readers of the Global History Forum and Global History Blog. “The World History Center and the Department of History seek applicants,” the advertisement notes,

for a one-year postdoctoral fellowship in world history beginning fall 2015, with the option of renewal for a second year. We seek candidates who can demonstrate strong training in global historical studies, and whose research interests are cross-disciplinary, multiregional, and/or have varied time frames. The successful candidate will participate in research, teaching, and other activities of the center and the department. Research will include individual research plus work on such Center projects as the Alliance for Learning in World History and the Collaborative for Historical Information and Analysis.  Teaching will include two world history courses each year. Salary and benefits are competitive. Candidates must have completed their Ph.D. within the past eight years but before June 2015.

Applicants are requested to send a letter of application, a full CV, a dissertation chapter, and three letters of recommendation to Diego Holstein, Chair, World History Postdoctoral Search Committee, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260. Application materials may be submitted by e-mail to holstein@pitt.edu. The deadline for applications is February 27, 2015.

Call for Papers: “The Global Public: Its Power and Its Limits” (German Historical Institute, London)

Our friends at the German Historical Institute in London are organizing a conference this coming autumn that will surely interest followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation. Entitled “The Global Public: Its Power and Its Limits,” the conference, taking place from October 22-24, 2015 and organized by Valeska Huber (GHI London) and Jürgen Osterhammel (Koblenz),

will explore theories and practices of a global public in the long twentieth century. Recent forms of mass protest and debates around open, censored or intercepted flows of information have triggered debates about the power and limits of the global public. Yet many preconditions for such a global public had their origin in the last decades of the nineteenth century, when global travel became more standardised and new media such as telegraphy, mass print and later film entered the scene. During the two world wars, the global public was mobilized and manipulated in an unprecedented manner. Communication theorists and internationalists of the inter-war period, such as John Dewey, Harold Lasswell and H.G. Wells, saw it as a rising political force that would change future decision-making. In war or crisis, peace activists and humanitarians evoked it as a moral tribunal and normative entity. The organisers of cultural and sporting events hoped for new worldwide audiences, which businessmen and advertisers associated with opportunities for profit-making on a new scale. Politicians recognised the global public as a force for prestige and image cultivation, for instance during the Cold War, turning it into an arena of intense competition. At the same time the related technologies, especially print media and film, and their penetration of different world regions and layers of society provided a field of experimentation, and the limits of the global public, on a geographical and social but also on a normative scale, remained visible.

The call for papers elaborates on the themes of the conference. Those interested in participating are requested to send proposals including their  name, institutional affiliation or place of residence and title of paper; an abstract no longer than 500 words, and a brief CV to huber@ghil.ac.uk no later than February 28, 2015. Participants not based in the UK should not hesitate to apply: travel and accommodation expenses will be covered.

Glenda Sluga (Sydney) To Give Masters Classes in Global History at UCLA in January 2015

An announcement over from our colleagues at the University of Sydney’s Laureate Research Program in International History: over the course of three sessions in January 2015, Professor Glenda Sluga will be giving a three-session workshop on International History and the History of the Human Rights, to be held at the University of California, Los Angeles. “In Europe, the United States, and increasingly in Australia,” reads the announcement,

a revival of scholarly interest in all things ‘international’ is pushing historical research into new directions. A decade after Lynn Hunt, as President of the American Historical Association, predicted that diplomatic history would be the ‘next big thing’, it is the broader reach of international history that is captivating historical imaginations. This ‘international turn’ includes the study of foreign policy, but its methodologies and themes are richer than we could have expected, feeding into histories of imperialism, colonialism, feminism, economics, women, the national as well as the transnational and global.  

The workshops–titled “Tracking the International Turn,” “Applying the International Turn,” and “Elaborating the International Turn”–will be devoted to unpacking what, exactly, a turn towards the international scale might mean. Given Sluga’s extensive work within the field, these events should be a draw for any interested readers in Southern California–and some outside of it, too.

The three meetings are on January 9th, 16th, and 23rd. More information can be found on the flyer here. The organizers note that pre-registration (more information at the links) is required, although participants will be required to submit a short statement of their own interests. Course credit will be available for those who require it; a light lunch, for all.

New Atlas of Global History Institutions

Followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation will recall that we unveiled this current version of our website this autumn after extensive revision and collaboration with the fantastic staff at George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Along with that re-design has come new features, like our periodical Interviews with Global Historians.

As we continue to expand the site’s functionality, we’re happy to announce a new page–an “atlas” of global history institutions that you can either find here or via the drop-down menu under “Participate,” in the top-right hand corner of your browser window.

Continue reading

Oxford Centre for Global History

The Oxford Centre for Global History was established by the History Faculty in June 2011 to reflect its strong commitment to promoting Global History. The Centre is based in the History Faculty Building in George Street, Oxford.

Global History
Global History in Oxford is defined broadly as the global movement of people, goods and ideas and the consequences that flow from them. Chronologically, it extends across all historical periods from Ancient to Late Modern. The Centre is particularly keen to encourage cooperation between historians of different periods, as well as places, in the study of themes of global significance, including:

  • The dialogue between imperial, transnational and comparative history
  • The different meanings of the concept ‘global’, including the balance in the dialogue between cultures in different historical periods
  • The global history of rights, and the history of global governance
  • Cross-cultural and transnational histories of varieties of representative government and of public spheres (including attitudes to public ethics and the global history of corruption)
  • The development of economic interdependence, including its relation to technological transfer and scientific interchange
  • The movement of peoples as against the movement of ideas and practices
  • The history of regions seen in a global context, and the study of intersecting local societies
  • The roles of lingua francas in history, including the practices of translation and their cultural significance

Incubating New Research
The Centre’s purpose is to promote Global History through the support of research projects and the provision of workshops, seminars and conferences. The ‘founding’ conference ‘New Directions in Global History’ took place on 27-29 September 2012 and ‘The Great War and Global History’ conference was on 9-10 January 2014.

However, a key part of the Centre’s role is to facilitate the research of all those in Oxford who are keen to develop a global history dimension in their work. In its History Faculty and in kindred departments, including Classics and Ancient History, Oriental Studies, Chinese Studies, Politics and International Relations and Economics, Oxford has one of the largest concentrations in the world of historians and others with interests in Global History. The Centre is designed to reflect and promote these wide-ranging interests, developing and carrying out team projects on clearly significant issues that cross time, space, and discipline.

The Centre’s activities are generously supported by the Oxford University Press John Fell Fund.

 

LSE IDEAS

LSE IDEAS was founded in 2008 and now runs a series of regional and topical programmes. The centre currently does research on the international affairs of East and Southeast Asia, the Balkans, the United States, the Middle East, Latin America, Africa and on the history of the Cold War. With the International History and International Relations departments, IDEAS has pioneered a unique two-year Masters degree in international affairs with the School of International Studies at Peking University, the first European-Asian elite degree of its kind. The centre also works together with other international partners, such as Columbia University, Princeton University, Sciences Po, and the National University of Singapore, in developing new programmes and research initiatives. IDEAS is a centre of PhD training within the LSE and hosts a number of visitors, advanced doctoral students, academics and foreign policy practitioners, from across the globe. The centre has also developed training programmes for foreign service officers from several countries.

LSE IDEAS proudly manages the Executive MSc Diplomacy and International Strategy. The aim of this executive programme is to enhance decision makers’ confidence in their strategic vision on how to address global challenges of the 21st century. The interplay between a wide array of academics, experts, practitioners and experienced participants guarantees vivid debate and candid analysis. Being based within LSE IDEAS, the programme allows participants to profit directly from a wide number of events and reports.

LSE IDEAS organises numerous public lectures and seminars and publishes two journals, two book series and a number of occasional publications. It contributes to the LSE’s Summer Schools in London and in Beijing and organises a number of out-of-term events outside London, in Cambridge, Bologna and elsewhere.

LSE IDEAS holds the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs, a one-year distinguished visiting professorship for leading scholars based outside the UK. Philippe Roman professors contribute to teaching within the Centre’s key areas of activity. The Philippe Roman Professors for 2007-2012 have been Paul Kennedy (Yale), Chen Jian (Cornell), Gilles Kepel (Sciences Po), Niall Ferguson (Harvard), Ramachandra Guha and Anne Applebaum. The 2013/14 holder of the Chair is Professor Timothy Snyder.

International Security Studies at Yale

International Security Studies (ISS) at Yale was founded in 1988 and is co-directed by Paul M. Kennedy and Adam Tooze. Our unit is supported by the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Jewett Foundation, and the Friends of ISS.  John Lewis Gaddis directs the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, which operates under ISS’s auspices.

Although ISS is not a degree-granting program, our faculty members write and teach about numerous aspects of international history and world affairs.  Our interests range from high politics and economic change to cultural transfer and nongovernmental activism.  We are pedagogical pluralists—interested in explaining the genealogy of modern times, and developing holistic, comprehensive ways to think about the twenty-first century.

ISS organizes an array of extracurricular activities each academic year.  We host lectures, dinner debates, conferences, colloquia, and discussion groups.  In addition to publishing a paper series about the historical roots of contemporary issues, we provide competitive summer grants to support language training and archival research for Yale students. Postdoctoral fellowships and predoctoral fellowships are available to scholars from other universities, and for serving members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

International & Global History at Harvard University

Harvard University is a major center for research and teaching in international and global history. Related activities include:

Forums for new research: An annual graduate student conference, which convenes each spring, and a seminar series, which meets several times each term to discuss cutting edge research.

Courses: To explore the courses offered in international & global history, please visit individual faculty pages.

Ph.D. program: International History is a vibrant track within the History Department’s graduate program, typically admitting several new students each year. For current international history graduate students, see here.

International & Global History at Harvard University is supported by the Department of History, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History.

For more information, see http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~int-hist/