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CFP: “Memory and Religion: Central and Eastern Europe in a Global Perspective” (16-18 October, 2018)

For those interested in secularism and relationships between religious systems, here’s an interesting call for you! European Network Remembrance and Solidarity (ENRS) has announced a conference titled “Memory and Religion: Central and Eastern Europe in a Global Perspective.” The call explains more: Contemporary post-secular researchers stress that in the time of multiples modernities, secular and…

What We’re Reading This Week

Saba Mahmood, Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.

FATMA ALADAĞ

Gabriela Marcovich, “On the Potentialities (and Limits) of Collaboration in Global History,” L’Atelier.

Priya Satia, “The Whitesplaining of History is Over,” The Chronicle.

Sagnik Dutta, “Remembering Saba Mahmood,” The Wire.

Kris Manjapara, “When Will Britain Face Up to its Crimes Against Humanity?,” The Guardian.

ADEN KNAAP

Rana Dasgupta, “The Demise of the Nation State,” The Guardian.

Several authors, “The Awakening,” The Chronicle.

Sarah Dunstan, “A Conversation with Professor Stefanos Geroulanos,” JHI Blog.

Amia Srinivasan, “Does Anyone Have the Right to Sex?,” London Review of Books.

SEAN PHILLIPS

Benjamin Mountford & Stephen Tufnell, “How Gold Rushes Helped Make Modern History,” The Conversation.

John Motyka, “Alfred Crosby, ‘Father of Environmental History,’ Is Dead at 87,” The New York Times.

Christopher Bae, “In to Asia,” Aeon.

Rohan Deb Roy, “Decolonise Science – Time to End Another Imperial Era,” The Conversation.

Summer Academy: “Labour and Leisure in Global History” (University of Nairobi, 9-16 September, 2018)

For those interested in summer programs on global history, here’s a recent call for you! The international research centre Work and Human Lifecycle in Global (re:work), the IAAW at Humboldt University Berlin, and the Faculty of Arts, University of Nairobi have announced a summer academy related to labor history. The call explains more: The international research…

The Arabic Freud: An Interview with Omnia El Shakry

Omnia El Shakry, The Arabic Freud: Psychoanalysis and Islam in Modern Egypt (Princeton University Press, 2017)

ʿIlm al-nafs might be translated as both psychology and the science of the soul. Attending to the routes (roots?) of psychoanalysis in postwar Egypt, Omnia El Shakry asks what it means to think of Islam and psychoanalysis together as “a creative encounter of ethical engagement.” This is both the task and provocation of The Arabic Freud: Psychoanalysis and Islam in Modern Egypt (Princeton University Press, 2017).

The book’s opening epigraph comes from the Egyptian psychoanalyst Moustapha Safouan: “In truth, we find treatises on the soul in Arabic works that evoke the Freudian division among the parts of the personality: id, ego, and superego.” The Arabic Freud, then, explores the multivalent encounters between psychoanalysis and Islamic thought, turning and returning to the question of the unconscious and the modern subject. At once disruptive of the oppositions that drive narratives of incommensurability between psychoanalysis and Islam (i.e. attempts to “put Islam on the couch” and civilizing missions of psychoanalysis) and conductive of the epistemological resonances between discursive traditions, The Arabic Freud offers and inspires ethical possibility.

El Shakry studied in Cairo, New York, and Princeton, where she focused on, among other topics, the modern Middle East, European intellectual history, and the history of colonialism. Now Professor of History at the University of California, Davis, she is a founding member of the Middle East/South Asia Studies Program there and teaches courses in History, Critical Theory, and Cultural Studies. She is the author of The Great Social Laboratory: Subjects of Knowledge in Colonial and Postcolonial Egypt (2007) and editor of Gender and Sexuality in Islam (2016). “Even though as a historian my intercourse is with the dead,” she says, “it’s still an encounter.” El Shakry works within this encounter, this transferential space.

Joel van de Sande

What We’re Reading This Week

Wünsdorf mosque – built by Allied Muslim POWs.

CAROLINE KAHLENBERG

Elizabeth Dore, ‘Which Way for Cuba?,’ Dissent.

Ab Cahan, ‘My First Pesach in America – In 1883,’ Forward.

Walter Johnson, ‘Guns in the Family,’ Boston Review.

Rachel Syme, ‘The Fate of the Juicy Couture Tracksuit in the Age of Athleisure,’ The New Yorker.

CHRIS SZABLA

Christian Schröder, ‘Der Islam gehört zu Preußen (‘Islam Belongs to Prussia’),’ Der Tagesspiegel.

Linda Colley, ‘Can History Help?,’ London Review of Books.

Pankaj Mishra, ‘Crisis in Modern Masculinity,’ The Guardian.

Priya Satia, ‘The Whitesplaining of History is Over,’ Chronicle of Higher Education.

JOSEPH SATISH

Sheila Jasanoff and Benjamin Hurlbut, ‘A Global Observatory for Gene Editing,’ Nature.

Aarthi Sridhar, ‘A Journey with the Sacred Chank,’ Frontline.

Ian Scoones, ‘Realising an Emancipatory Rural Politics in the Face of Authoritarian Populism,’ Open Democracy.

Jordan Collver, ‘My Evolution: Living Along the Spectrum of Science and Religion,’ Science Religion Spectrum.

CFP: “Global War, Global Connections, Global Moments – International Conference about the First World War” (University of Newcastle, Australia, July 16-18, 2018)

For those interested in the First World War in a global context, this conference titled “Global War, Global Connections, Global Moments – International Conference about the First World War” is for you. The call for papers explains more: A century after the end of the First World War, this conference is an occasion to reflect…

What We’re Reading This Week

Book Cover ‘Zabiba and the King,’ Saddam Hussein

JAMES PARKER

Bronwen Everill, ‘Demarginalizing West Africa in the Age of Revolutions,’ Blog Age of Revolutions.

Miriam Abaya, ‘The Resignation of Old Leaders Does Not Guarantee a New Era of Leadership in Africa,’ Blog Africa@LSE.

Ben Reynolds, ‘Some Problems in the Theory of Imperialism,’ Fragments.

Adam J. Sacks, ‘”All Humans Are Born Equal”,’ Jacobin.

JOSHUA MILSTEIN

Samuel Loncar, ‘Decolonizing Philosophy,’ LA Review of Books Marginalia.

Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Erica Frantz, ‘Putin’s Seccession Conundrum,’Foreign Affairs.

Colin Dickey, ‘Why Dictators Write,’The New Republic.

Josh Freedman, ‘The Sincere Indignation of Simon Leys,’ LA Review of Books China Channel.

BOYD VAN DIJK

Adam Tooze, ‘Notes on the Global Condition,’ Blog Adam Tooze.

Jennifer Wilson, ‘Floating in the Air,’ The Nation.

Stephen Wertheim and Thomas Meaney, ‘When the Leader of the Free World Is an Ugly American,’ The New York Times.

Brian Urquhart, ‘One Angry Man,’ The New York Review of Books.

Summer School: Imaginations, Construction and Staging of Space in Global Processes (University Leipzig, Germany, June 11-14, 2018)

It’s time to begin planning your summer program and conference travels in global history! The Graduate School Global and Area Studies at the University of Leipzig, Germany is organizing a summer school titled “Imaginations, Construction and Staging of Space in Global Processes” for June 11-14, 2018. The announcement explains more: Over the past decade, the…

Global Histories of Neoliberalism: An Interview with Quinn Slobodian

Liat Spiro recently sat down with Quinn Slobodian in Cambridge, MA to discuss his new book, Globalists: The End of Empire and the Birth of Neoliberalism (Harvard University Press, 2018).

Slobodian, associate professor of history at Wellesley College and currently ACLS Burkhardt Fellow at the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History at Harvard University, revealed how neoliberal thinkers developed a vision of global free trade in goods and capital, though not necessarily people, during the crises of the 1930s and the era of decolonization. In Globalists, he argues that neoliberal thinkers did not oppose the state and prize individualism, but rather sought to use rules to encase the market away from democratic governance.

The discussion also presented a chance to explore neoliberals’ interpretations of the nexus between law and economics as well as current debates over the significance of racism to neoliberal thought. Slobodian explained the role of Central Europe in the global history of neoliberalism and the legacy of the Habsburg Empire for neoliberals’ understanding of political economy. Slobodian addressed the critical conflation of neoliberalism, economism, and pretensions to all-knowability in the recent historiography of the “invention of the economy.”

Over the course of this conversation about economists’ and historians’ “trust in numbers,” or lack thereof, Slobodian proposed reviving leftist and heterodox economics. Looking ahead, he presented steps for writing global histories of neoliberalism beyond Globalists, tracing the unpredictable, highly transnational, and strongly contested circuits through which economic concepts get taken up into policymaking.

The interview is illustrated by stills from The Walls of the WTO, a collaborative film project by Slobodian and the filmmaker Ryan S. Jeffery. The film will appear in the exhibition Say Shibboleth! On Visible and Invisible Borders, opening at the Jewish Museum Hohenems in April 2018.

Liat Spiro (Harvard University)