Tag: Conferences and CFPs

“Languages of Internationalism” (Conference, Birkbeck College, London May 25-26, 2017)

Interested in the field of the history of internationalism? Here’s a recently posted call for papers for a conference in London, “The Languages of Internationalism,” taking place on May 25-26, 2017 and organized by Dr. Jessica Reinisch‘s The Reluctant Internationalists research group at Birkbeck College.

Scholars have in recent years re-energized the study of how peoples, cultures, and economies came, over time, to be linked and entangled across all manner of borders. Transnationalism and internationalism continue to be the watchwords of much humanities and social sciences scholarship. Yet insufficient attention has been paid to the crucial politics of language in historical scenarios of internationalism as a lived or imagined human enterprise. Organised by the Reluctant Internationalists research group at Birkbeck College London in collaboration with Brigid O’Keeffe from Brooklyn College, CUNY, this conference will bring together historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, linguists, and scholars in related fields, to debate the languages of internationalism.

The goal of the conference is to shed light on the centrality of language to people’s past pursuit and experience of internationalism. Historians must better understand the linguistic realities that their subjects confronted in their various global networks and endeavors. For any agents of internationalism, language presented a wide variety of challenges and opportunities. It imposed obstacles and provided avenues to mutual understanding and collaboration among diverse peoples. The relative successes and failures of past internationalist projects in large measure owed to participants’ ability to effectively communicate across not just linguistic, but also political, cultural, economic, and professional boundaries. This fundamental and literal question of (mis)communication has dramatically shaped the lives of peoples variously confronting the global realities or pretensions of their milieus.

CONFERENCE CFP: “XXVth Conference of the Australasian Association for European History” (Monash University, July 11 – 14 2017)

The Monash University (Australia) is pleased to announce 25th Conference of the Australasian Association for European History focusing on Europe’s Entanglements, to be held at Monash University’s Caulfield Campus in Melbourne on  July 11 – 14, 2017.  The conference announcement explains more about the program,

As Europe commemorates the centenary of the Great War, current conflicts nearby spark the largest influx of refugees since the Second World War. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom considers (once again) leaving the European Union, and economic downturn and the re-emergence of far right politics throughout the EU threatens its unravelling at the seams. What intervention can historians make to understand these developments? This conference invites a reconsideration of Europe’s entanglements – with the past, with its neighbours in the world, and within itself ­­­– and how these have been forged as well as unmade through the commemoration and forgetting of its history, the movement of people across its borders, the clash of political and economic interests, the encounters between different ideologies and worldviews.

We invite established scholars as well as postgraduates to discuss Europe’s entanglements (and disentanglements), their historical roots, contours and contemporary resonance, from the eighteenth century to the present, on the topics below. Individual papers are welcome, and we also encourage panel proposals.

Call for Panels, ENIUGH Congress (Budapest, August 31-September 3, 2017)

For those readers of the Global History Blog already looking ahead to their plans for next year–or those interested in putting together panels with colleagues–here’s a recent announcement worth following. From August 31-September 3, 2017, the Fifth European Congress on World and Global History (ENIUGH) will be taking place in Budapest, Hungary. The theme this year is “Ruptures, Empires, Revolutions.”

The call for submissions explains more:

Under the overall theme “Ruptures, Empires, Revolutions” and on the occasion of the centennial of the Russian Revolution, we seek to discuss the global context and repercussions of the revolution in particular while debating the role of revolutions in global history in general. In recent global history scholarship, the relationship between empire and revolution has been less explored than other topics. Furthermore, revolutionary upheavals have mostly been interpreted as caesuras in national histories and not as being situated in global dynamics. Considering still influential narratives, like the supposedly universal trend from “empire to nation”, we encourage such views to be challenged through a comparative and global perspective on empires and imperial societies. The chosen focus also has the potential to place centre stage as well as compare and explore the interconnectedness of uneven social and political change around the world, including both colonial as well as post-colonial settings. Against the backdrop, panel proposals will explore large-scale socioeconomic crises, changing labour and social regimes as well as economic orders, movements advancing social and political reforms, as well as the breakdown and the reconstruction of political orders, with the cultural, technological, and ideological underpinnings.

Liberal-(Il)liberal-Internationalisms: New Paradigms for the History of the Twentieth Century (Vienna, December 2016)

Regular followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation’s Global History Forum feature will recall one of our interviews with the Australian historian of modern Russia and the Soviet Union Philippa Hetherington, whose work touches on the history of sex trafficking and the inflection of themes of gender with international history. Fortunately for readers of our blog,…

Global History Graduate Student Conference (Freie Universität Berlin, May 21-22, 2016)

Over at the M.A. Program in Global History in Berlin, our colleagues announce the second iteration of their global history conference for graduate students. This is a terrific opportunity for graduate students in Europe to begin networking, to get a sense of the shape of the field, and to receive helpful feedback and criticism on their…

Summer School, European Network in Universal and Global History, June 30-July 2, 2016

The summer may seem far away, but it’s not too early to begin planning your conference and research travel for the vacation season—especially if you’re a PhD candidate working on transnational and global topics. The European Network in Universal and Global History (ENIUGH) has recently announced a summer workshop for doctoral candidates to take place…

Graduate Student Global History Conference – Tufts University, March 5, 2016

Are you a graduate student based in or around New England and interested in getting feedback on your global history project – a dissertation chapter, an article-in-draft, or a new project? The Tufts History Department has announced a Graduate Student Global History Conference to take place on March 5, 2016 at Tufts University, in Medford, MA.…

Call for Papers: Transnational and Global Histories of Latin America’s Revolutionary Left

Here’s an interesting call for papers for not one, but two conferences on Latin American history in a global context, both organized by LSE’s Tanya Harmer and Alberto Martín Álvarez of the Instituto Mora in Mexico City.

A long description of both conferences follows; interested applicants should be aware that the deadline for applying is July 3, 2015, with a one page proposal in either Spanish or English and a brief academic CV, sent either to Harmer (t.harmer@lse.ac.uk) or  Álvarez (amartin@mora.edu.mx).

The LSE and the Instituto Mora are issuing calls for papers for two related international workshops that they are organising in 2016.  Funded by the British Academy’s Newton Mobility Fund, taking advantage of combined research expertise at both institutions, and linked to the established New Left Network led by Alberto Martín Álvarez and Eduardo Rey, the workshops aim to explore different perspectives on Latin America’s Revolutionary Left.

Although both workshops are part of the same broader project to examine global and transnational histories of Latin America’s Revolutionary Left (otherwise known as the New Left of the Armed Left), it is anticipated that proposals will be made to one workshop or the other rather than both. Details of the workshops and the themes they wish to explore are as follows:

Global History Student Conference (Freie Universität Berlin, April 25-26)

A quick note to readers based in central Europe: this weekend (April 25-26), the Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut of the Freie Universität Berlin will host a Global History Student Conference, featuring ten panels with the work of graduate students hailing from around the world. The conference will also feature two workshops (“Collaborative Working” and “Global History and International Development: Listening…

Call for Papers: “The Transformation of Global History, 1963-1975” (Princeton University, October 2015)

Here’s an intriguing call for papers for a conference on global history – on the history of the discipline rather than papers exhibiting global or transnational approaches per se – taking place at Princeton University this October 9-10, 2015. Historical scholarship underwent a transformative period between 1963 and 1975. From insightful thinkers as William McNeill, Fernand Braudel, Immanuel Wallerstein, Alfred Crosby, Sidney…