CONFERENCE CFP: “XXVth Conference of the Australasian Association for European History” (Monash University, July 11 – 14 2017)

The Monash University (Australia) is pleased to announce 25th Conference of the Australasian Association for European History focusing on Europe’s Entanglements, to be held at Monash University’s Caulfield Campus in Melbourne on  July 11 – 14, 2017.  The conference announcement explains more about the program,

As Europe commemorates the centenary of the Great War, current conflicts nearby spark the largest influx of refugees since the Second World War. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom considers (once again) leaving the European Union, and economic downturn and the re-emergence of far right politics throughout the EU threatens its unravelling at the seams. What intervention can historians make to understand these developments? This conference invites a reconsideration of Europe’s entanglements – with the past, with its neighbours in the world, and within itself ­­­– and how these have been forged as well as unmade through the commemoration and forgetting of its history, the movement of people across its borders, the clash of political and economic interests, the encounters between different ideologies and worldviews.

We invite established scholars as well as postgraduates to discuss Europe’s entanglements (and disentanglements), their historical roots, contours and contemporary resonance, from the eighteenth century to the present, on the topics below. Individual papers are welcome, and we also encourage panel proposals.

“Emotions: Movemement, Cultural Contact and Exchange, 1100-1800” (Freie Universität Berlin, June 30- July 2 2016)

Here’s an upcoming conference that should appeal to readers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation’s Global History blog. From June 30 to July 2, 2016, the Freie Universität Berlin and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions will be hosting a conference devoted to the history of emotions focusing on cross-cultural movement, exchange,…

“Connectivity and Change: Regimes, Conflicts and Revolutions in Global Perspectives” (Ghent, Belgium, June 30-July 2, 2016)

For those readers of the Global History Blog looking for a summer program on global history–here’s a recent announcement is for you! From June 30-July 2, 2016, International Summer School “Connectivity and Change: Regimes, Conflicts and Revolutions in Global Perspectives” will be taking place in Ghent, Belgium. The announcement explains more:

About ten years ago historians began to open up to encounters across borders and entanglements between far-flung parts of the word. Now a lively research on transnational, transregional, world and global history topics exists, which is not only done by senior scholars but also by an ever increasing number of doctoral students. In that course connectivity has become a category for describing and explaining the past, of individual societies as well as of large-scale processes playing out at different places.

Conference Report: Global History Student Conference (Freie Universität Berlin)

In recent years, global history has undoubtedly become part of our life as a dynamic historical perspective. Writing history without borders and addressing events with all their actors in an effort to maintain a view of the biggest picture possible, global history enjoys a distinct place among other historical disciplines. Reading the world through an…

“The Indian Ocean World and Eurasian Connections” (Summer School, Halle, Germany, July 25-30, 2016)

If you are a graduate or a postdoctoral student from Germany or NYU Global Network universities in New York, Shanghai and Abu Dhabi, who want to spend the summer vacation efficiently, there is a great opportunity for you! The Center for Interdisciplinary Area Studies (ZIRS) at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, and the Center…

Interview with Serge Gruzinski on “L’histoire, pour quoi faire?”

Readers following recent historiographical debates about global history may be following not only scholars like Sebastian Conrad (whom we interviewed on his recent intervention this winter) but also the French historian Serge Gruzinski, who has written widely on the opportunities and pitfalls of a global history approach. Most recently, Gruzinski has authored a new book…

“Global History Day” (Conference, University Of Dundee, Scotland, May 18, 2016)

The University of Dundee’s The Scottish Centre for Global History is pleased to announce Global History Day, to be held at the River Rooms, Humanities Building, Tower at Dundee on  May 18, 2016. The program is planned as two session: the morning is “New Work in Global History” by book launch of Matthew Graham and Felicia Gottmann,…

Assistant Professor in History (Transnational/Global), New Jersey City University

For those readers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation’s electronic offerings looking for jobs in North America, here’s a recent call for applications at New Jersey City University – in Jersey City, NJ, just across the river from New York. The call for applications explains more: The History Program invites applications for a tenure-track faculty appointment…

Global History as Past and Future: A Conversation with Sebastian Conrad on “What Is Global History?”

It’s a common question that teachers of global history face. We belong to one of the most quickly-moving, contested, and changing subfields within the historical profession, and the travel schedules on many of our dockets—Istanbul one week, Tokyo the next—make our colleagues who slave away in the same provincial state archive blush. The years spent learning foreign languages begin to pay off, as one can not only read the newspaper but also foreign colleagues’ peer review comments on an article scheduled for publication in this or that journal. Life, it seems, is good.

But when it comes time to teach global history as a field, one hesitates. For audiences of graduate students, of course, it’s possible to follow the tactic of assigning a pile of monographs bringing global history perspectives to different regions of the planet: China the one week, the Gambia the next. But how to put it all together into one common language that speaks to the Americanists and the East Asianists in one seminar? Worse yet: how to teach this all to undergraduate audiences for whom the monograph approach would incite revolt?

Sebastian Conrad's "What Is Global History" (Princeton University Press, 2016), the subject of this latest installment of the Global History Forum

Sebastian Conrad’s “What Is Global History” (Princeton University Press, 2016), the subject of this latest installment of the Global History Forum

Fortunately, as we’ve noted in earlier installments of the Global History Forum, scholars of global history who formerly had to throw their hands up in response to this dilemma increasingly have at their disposal an array of good introductory works to the field. One might only think of the work of Diego Olstein, for a recent work in just this niche in English, or, for German-speaking audiences, a 2011 book that fills the same need by Austrian economic historian (and former TPF interviewee) Andrea Komlosy. At the field grows and becomes more sophisticated, though, so, too, are the options for introductory texts expanding. One of such works constitutes the focus of this installment of the Global History Forum, namely the aptly-titled What Is Global History? (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016) by Professor Sebastian Conrad, the Chair in Modern History at the Free University of Berlin.

Billed as a “problem-oriented” approach to global history that provides much-needed criticism and pauses alongside enthusiasm, Conrad’s What Is Global History? appears at just the right time for a field in much need of explaining itself to students—and to critically interrogating its own limits. Recently, Toynbee Prize Foundation Executive Director Timothy Nunan had the chance to speak with Professor Conrad to discuss his recent book and what he sees as the biggest challenges facing the field as it matures and grows in years ahead.…

CFP: “Environment, Society, and the Making of the Modern World: The History and Legacy of the UN Conference on the Human Environment” (Stockholm, Sweden, December 2016)

Here’s an exciting upcoming conference that we’ve caught at the last minute – the deadline for submissions is tomorrow! Professors Glenda Sluga (Sydney),  Sverker Sörlin (KTH Stockholm), and Paul Warde (Cambridge) are organizing a conference titled “Environment, Society, and the Making of the Modern World: The History and Legacy of the UN Conference on the Human…