Soccer as a Global Phenomenon (Harvard University, April 14-16, 2016)

In light of the recent FIFA scandals exposing the global interconnections of soccer (football, for non-North Americans), here’s an appropriately-timed call for papers from our colleagues at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Initiative on Global History for a conference–taking place from April 14-16, 2016–that promises to cast light on the global history of “the beautiful game”: Soccer is the most global of games and … Continue reading Soccer as a Global Phenomenon (Harvard University, April 14-16, 2016)

2015 Harvard International History Conference – “Transitions: States and Empires in the Longue Durée”

Our colleagues at Harvard have announced the schedule for this year’s Harvard Graduate Student Conference on international history, taking place this March 12-13, 2015 in Cambridge, Massachusetts (USA). In addition to stimulating presentations by graduate students around the world, the conference features a public keynote address by NYU’s Jane Burbank, “Escaping Empire, Escaping Europe? History and Historians … Continue reading 2015 Harvard International History Conference – “Transitions: States and Empires in the Longue Durée”

Unweaving Sven Beckert’s “Empire of Cotton: A Global History”

Pause for a moment while reading this review and check out the inside collar of your shirt or blouse. There’s a good chance that the garment you’re wearing is not only made out of cotton but was made in a country other than the one you’re living in: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Vietnam, Guatemala, or somewhere else … Continue reading Unweaving Sven Beckert’s “Empire of Cotton: A Global History”

Immigrants, Railroads, America, Germany: An Interview with Julío Robert Decker

People often ask scholars of history what, exactly, the discipline constitutes–what its unique methodologies are, what precisely its subject of study is, and what contemporary questions it offers to clarify. As our recent Global History Forum interviews have shown, one of the joys of the field is that it rejects the reassuring but often illusory … Continue reading Immigrants, Railroads, America, Germany: An Interview with Julío Robert Decker

Sven Beckert on the “Empire of Cotton”

Sven Beckert’s Empire of Cotton: it’s one of the most keenly anticipated works of history this year, and you can read an adapted excerpt here at The Atlantic. The Toynbee Prize Foundation will be featuring an in-depth review of the book in weeks to come–we’re busy preparing a number of other Interviews with Global Historians–but readers … Continue reading Sven Beckert on the “Empire of Cotton”

Excavating “The Last Empire”: Discussing Soviet History and Global History with Serhii Plokhii

Why did the Soviet Union collapse? Since the USSR formally ceased to exist on December 26, scores of books have been written on the Soviet dissolution, an event that resulted in the creation of fifteen new states across Eurasia and that current Russian President Vladimir Putin famously called “the greatest geopolitical catastrophe” of the twentieth century. … Continue reading Excavating “The Last Empire”: Discussing Soviet History and Global History with Serhii Plokhii

Global History Forum: Discussing “Starvation and the State: Famine, Slavery, and Power in Sudan, 1883-1956” with Steven Serels

For most audiences today, the word “Sudan” evokes images at once terrorizing and timeless. Older readers may recall the images of emaciated bodies that television crews relayed from western and eastern Sudan during the great famines of the mid-1980s. Anyone reading today, however, will remember the outrage – but also lack of meaningful reaction – that … Continue reading Global History Forum: Discussing “Starvation and the State: Famine, Slavery, and Power in Sudan, 1883-1956” with Steven Serels