Tag: Migration

CFP: Globalization and Migration in the 19th and 20th Centuries (Paderborn, Germany – November 2018)

“Europe has, in the final analysis, a utilitarian relationship to globalization,” write the organizers, at Germany’s Paderborn University, of a conference on how the subject relates to migration. It is a perspective that, for them, emerges from observing European efforts to impose controls on incoming refugee and migrant populations. “Yet,” they continue, “the history of migration…

CFP: Legacy of Slavery and Indentured Labor (Paramaribo, Suriname – June 2018)

The Anton de Kom University of Suriname is offering scholars worldwide the opportunity to discuss legacies of forced migration and labor in a unique time and place. The university’s history department, Institute for Graduate Studies and Research, Social Science Research Institute, and the Surinamese National Archives have partnered with a host of the country’s other…

CFP: Europe Between Migrations, Decolonization, and Integration (Florence, January 2018)

The Società italiana per lo studio della storia contemporanea (SISSCO, the Italian Society for the Study of Contemporary History) has been holding a stimulating series of seminars linking the processes of decolonization, postcolonial migration to Europe, and European unity and integration. The series, known as “Europe between migrations, decolonization and integration (1945-1992)” kicked off in Forli…

Assistant Professor, Diaspora Studies/Human Rights/Transnational Migration, Miami University

Miami University (located in Oxford, Ohio) has recently announced two relevant positions for global historians, one of which is in Diaspora Studies/Human Rights/Transnational Migration. The Department of Global and Intercultural Studies, notes a recent announcement, seeks a candidate to focus on migration and mobility to teach introductory courses in the Department of Global and Intercultural Studies, in addition…

Down Under, Transnational, Global: Exploring Russian and Soviet History with Philippa Hetherington

The Black Sea is in the news for all of the wrong reasons these days. Whether it’s the Russian annexation of Crimea, uncertainty surrounding the outcome of parliamentary elections in Moldova, or the breakdown of Moscow’s plans to conduct a natural gas pipeline to Europe via the Balkans, these former Tsarist borderlands (and shores) have become an object of geopolitical intrigue that few would have predicted only a year or two ago.

Lost among fears of a revived Cold War is another ongoing crisis in the region: namely, sex trafficking, or what earlier generations would have known as “the traffic in women.” Even as countries like Russia are some of the largest destination for immigrants from other parts of the former Soviet Union, Moscow’s former western borderlands–Ukraine and especially Moldova–constitute some of the largest “exporters” of women into the international sex trade. Sold into criminal gangs as “white” women, women from these countries may find themselves trafficked to brothels in Russia, Turkey, Israel, the UAE, or other destinations. For countries like Ukraine and Moldova, where per-capita income is the same as in Sudan, human traffickers find ideal conditions, helping make human trafficking the third most lucrative criminal enterprise in the world, according to the United Nations.

The human trafficking crisis may be forgotten in the light of the region’s other ongoing problems, but like disputes over Ukraine’s place between Europe and Russia or the geopolitics of energy, it, too, has a history. Indeed, perhaps obviously more so than these other two regional problems, the history of “the traffic in women” has obviously global dimensions. Women kidnapped from Chisinau, Kiev, or Minsk may belong to individual nation-states, but the networks that disappear them–and the states and international agencies that sometimes seek to rescue them–are engaged in a battle that takes place above, over, and through the lines on a map. But more than simply reifying all-too-frequent panics over sex trafficking, global history scholarship on the history of sex trafficking must not ignore larger dimensions of racial hierarchy or global migration writ large.

Philippa Hetherington, our latest guest to the Global History Forum

Philippa Hetherington, our latest guest to the Global History Forum

Such nuances lie at the heart of the work of the latest guest to the Global History Forum, Philippa Hetherington. In her work, the recent Harvard PhD explores the emergence of “trafficking in women” as a specific crime in fin-de-siècle Russia, arguing that the legal battle against sex trafficking needs to be understood in terms of larger, global dynamics not unique to just Russia. Working at the intersections of Russian and global history, Philippa recently took time out from her current post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Sydney in her native Australia to speak about her work.…