CFP: “Global War, Global Connections, Global Moments – International Conference about the First World War” (University of Newcastle, Australia, July 16-18, 2018)

For those interested in the First World War in a global context, this conference titled “Global War, Global Connections, Global Moments – International Conference about the First World War” is for you. The call for papers explains more: A century after the end of the First World War, this conference is an occasion to reflect…

CFP: The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 and the Challenge of a New World Order (Paris, June 2019)

A century ago today, the end of the carnage unfolding between the trenches of the Western Front of the First World War was scarcely imaginable. But so momentous were the consequences for subsequent world history of the eventual end of the conflict – the Versailles and other treaties that emerged from the Paris Peace Conference, and the movements that sought to influence them – that organizers are already mobilizing for a “major international conference” on the subject in the very city where the post-WWI order was shaped in 1919.

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The Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles, among the main sites of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 / Image: paristoversailles.org

To be convened under the aegis of the Institut historique allemand (IHA)/Deutsches Historisches Institut Paris (DHIP), LABEX EHNE, and the Commission d’histoire des relations internationales/Commission for the History of International Relations, “[t]he purpose of this event is to re-examine the history of the Peace Conference through a thematic focus on the different approaches to order in world politics in the aftermath of the First World War.” The organizers further specify:

CFP: Women and World War I (Slovenia and Italy, November 2017)

Readers of the global history blog working at the intersection of gender studies and world history may like to explore this international conference to be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia and Gorizia, Italy in November 2017. Please find below the original call for papers from the organizers: Women and World War I The Department of History at the…

CFP: Settlement and Unsettlement: The Ends of World War I and their Legacies (German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C., March 22-24, 2018

Here’s a call for papers on the postwar (un)settlements of World War I, appropriately timed to commemorate the centenary of the 1918 armistice: The armistice of November 11, 1918, is widely commemorated as the end of World War I, but that event was only part of a protracted process with far-reaching consequences. A series of…

“Empires after the First World War” (Conference, University of Trento, May 19-20, 2016)

For those TPF readers in the vicinity of northern Italy, here’s a reminder that the University of Trento will host the conference “Empires after the First World War – Ideas of Empire, Identity and Citizenship” from May 19-20 (i.e. Thursday and Friday of this week).

Organized by Gustavo Corni, Massimo Campanini, Paolo Carta, Sara Lorenzini, Marco Pertile, and Simone Bellezza, the conference will be hosted by the Department of Humanities in the School of International Studies, and will feature scholars whose work promises to treat the First World Warin an international context. All sessions will take place in Room 001, via Tommaso Gar, 14.

For the schedule with a listing of all sessions, click on “read more.”

Peace Without Victory: Adam Tooze on “The Deluge: The Great War, America, and the Remaking of the Global Order 1916-1931”

In case you haven’t noticed, this year marks the 100-year anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War. Visit a bookstore, and you’re likely to be greeted at the entrance by scores of books devoted to explaining how the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand sparked a European conflagration. Search beyond the piles at the front of the store, and, if you’re lucky, you may even find books that explore the war outside of its European context.

But in a year full of books devoted to the centenary of the war, few works have been so eagerly anticipated as that of historian Adam Tooze, whose The Deluge: The Great War, America, and the Remaking of the Global Order 1916-1931 has recently appeared on bookshelves on both sides of the Atlantic. Tooze has long been well-known to specialists on European economic and intellectual history since his earlier work on statistics and state-making in Germany. To more general readers, however, he may be better known for his 2008 The Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy, which secured his reputation as one of the leading historians of German and European history writing today.

Cover image of Adam Tooze's new book, "The Deluge"

Cover image of Adam Tooze’s new book, “The Deluge”

Economic history may have a reputation as dusty, dry, and, well, boring in some quarters today. But in Wages, Tooze showed how an economic history perspective was crucial to understanding Nazi grand strategy and even the origins of the Holocaust itself. More than that, Wages relocated the pivotal place of the United States in the worldview of Adolf Hitler and other leading Nazi figures. As the United States emerged as a qualitatively new force in global affairs, anyone seeking to shape the global order had to draw lessons from the new colossus. Figures like Hitler recognized that “American economic might would be the decisive factor in the shaping of the world order.” More than that, the American challenge was a new political and economic formation on a new scale, “a consolidated federal republic of continental scale, a super-sized nation state” that, thanks to its might and geography, “had a unique claim and capacity to exert global influence.”

The American entrance into European and global affairs really took on full shape concomitant to the First World War–an insight that drives much of The Deluge, and which explains its temporal framing. 1916 was the year when American economic output exceeded that of the British Empire, 1931 the year of Herbert Hoover’s moratorium on war debts. As commentators today question whether we might be entering a “post-American century,” understanding how the American giant burst onto the global scene in the first place is all the more urgent. The Toynbee Prize Foundation had the opportunity to sit down with Tooze recently to discuss his path to history, the book, and his future projects for this installment of Global History Forum.