Author: Martin Crevier

What We’re Reading This Week

Colin Bernard Wolfgang Streeck, “Progressive Regression” , The New Left Review Ian Johnson, “The Eastern Jesus”, The New York Review of Books Adom Getachew, “Holding Ourselves Responsible”, The Boston Review  Rafael Rojas, “El 68 mexicano: la nueva historia”, Letras Libres Dexter Govan Breda O’Brien, “UCD to turn on canonisation of John Henry Newman,” The Irish Times  Rhian E. Jones, “Remembering…

CFP: Cambridge World History Workshop (Fall 2019)

The Cambridge World History Workshop is inviting submissions to deliver papers during Michaelmas Term 2019 (October – December). The workshop welcomes contributions that give attention to global historical perspectives. We welcome, amongst others, presentations that focus on economic histories, histories of science, migration, race, gender, colonial and post-colonial studies, and comparative history. We encourage presenters…

What We’re Reading This Week

Martin Crevier Aaron Ackerly, “Old Prejudices, New Debates: J.A. Hobson and Anti-Semitism,” History Matters Damian Zane, “Why is a Tanzanian chief’s skull mentioned in the Versailles Treaty?,” BBC Christine Chevalier-Caron, “Algérie, une histoire de révolutions: discussions avec trois jeunes engagés,” Histoire engagées Natalie C. Behrends Audrey Farley, “We Still Don’t Know How to Navigate the…

What We’re Reading This Week

The front page of L’Humanité on November 1, 1956

Matthew Bowser

Alex Ward, “Aung San Suu Kyi Meets with Hungary’s Orbán to Lament their ‘Growing Muslim Populations’”, Vox

Vincent Bevins, “What the United States Did in Indonesia”, The Atlantic

Ajay Verghese, “Is India Becoming a ‘Hindu State’?”, The Washington Post

Sean O’Grady, “Just like the Suez Crisis, Brexit Humiliation is a Stark Reminder of Britain’s Waning Global Influence”, The Independent

Dexter Govan

Meehan Crist, “A Strange Blight“, London Review of Books 

Richard English, “If Brexit, rather than militant Irish republicanism, brings about end to partition, how will future view violence of the past?” Belfast Telegraph 

Rana Foroohar, “Plans for a worker-led economy straddle America’s political dividesThe Financial Times

Simon Vazquez, “Losing Barcelona“, Jacobin

Colin Bernard

Howard W. French, “Africa’s Lost Kingdoms“, NY Review

Sarah A. Seo, “How Cars Transformed Policing“, Boston Review

Kim Phillips-Fein, “Fear and Loathing of the Green New Deal“, The New Republic

Peter Svik, “Global Neo-Colonialism (Or on the Cold War and What Came After)“, LSE International History Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Image 2 of 3 for Nuevo Cocinero Mexicano en Forma de Diccionario
Nuevo Cocinero Mejicano, 1872 (Source: Pazzo Books)

Joseph Satish

Ehsan Masood, “How China is redrawing the map of world science” , Nature

Zoe Jackson, “ARPANET and the Development of the Internet, 50 Years Later”, Perspectives on History

Prerna Gupta & M V Ramana, “A Decade After the Nuclear Deal”The India Forum

Mark Kinver, “Compassionate conservation is ‘seriously flawed'”, BBC News

Sean Phillips

Damon Salesa, “Decolonising the Pacific”, E-Tangata 

Katharina Rietzler, “The Hotel Majestic and the Origins of Chatham House”Chatham House

Joshua Specht, “American Bull“, Aeon 

Mary Hui, “The generations are warring in Hong Kong over the memory of Tiananmen”, Quartz

Yehor Brailian

Keith Lowe, “Was 1945 the World’s Year Zero?”, History Extra

Alexander Lee, “Enchiladas, a Culinary Monument to Colonialism”, History Today

Onni Gust, “Radical Books: Trans Like Me (2017), CN Lester,” Historical Workshop

Nicholas Germana, “Hegel and the Sphinx: The Riddle of World History”, JHI Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Jean-Pascal Sébah, Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, 1890s (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

James Parker

Kapil Komireddi, “Five More Years of Narendra Modi Will Take India to a Dark Place,” The Guardian

Lauren MacIvor Thompson, “Abortion: The Archive Doesnt Lie, but Republicans Do“, Nursing Clio 

Elias Rodriques, “Building Another World: When the Black Panthers Came to Algeria,” The Nation 

Chloe Bordewich

Arafat Razzaque, “Who was the ‘real’ Aladdin? From Chinese to Arab in 300 Years,” Ajam Media Collective

Hala al-Bazri, “بدايات في ‘فرنجة التسطير’’: كيف واكب الشدياق انتقال الكتاب من النخبة إلى العامة,” Bidayat

Sam Haselby, “Muslims of Early America,” Aeon

Chris Szabla

Dexter Fergie, “The Department of Everything,” LA Review of Books 

Adam Shatz, “Orientalism Then and Now,” NYRB

Suzy Hansen, “Timeless Life of the Grand Bazaar,Lapham’s Quarterly

Thomas Wells, “Asshole Nationalism: Toward a New Theory of International Relations,ABC Religion and Ethics 
 

What We’re Reading This Week

Madeleine Albright and Richard Holbrooke, 1996 (Source: AFP/Getty Images)

Liat Spiro

Yuliya Komska, “In Search of an Anti-Fascist Language,” Boston Review 

Jan-Werner Müller, “Populism and the People,” LRB

K-Sue Park, “Self-Deportation Nation,” Harvard Law Review 

Tiger Zhifu Li

Greg Lockhart, “What we forget on ANZAC Day,” Pearls and Irritations

Kirsty Needham and Matthew Knott, “White House Reviews Military Plans Against Iran, in Echoes of Iraq War,” NYT

Diver breaks record with deepest submarine voyage ever recorded, finds discarded plastic,” NZ Herald

Natalie C. Behrends

David A. Bell, “Daniel Bell at 100,” Dissent

John Schneider, “‘Working’: A Brief History of History,” LA Review of Books

George Packer, “The End of the American Century,” Atlantic Monthly

What We’re Reading This Week

Résultats de recherche d'images pour « Hannah Arendt »
Hannah Arendt (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Matthew Bowser

Stephen Kinzer, “Inside Iran’s Fury”, Smithsonian Magazine

Soutik Biswas, “India election 2019: How sugar influences the world’s biggest vote”, BBC World News

Christopher Clark, “South Africa elections: What are the main issues?”, Al Jazeera

Mapping the Yemen Conflict”, European Council on Foreign Relations

Colin Bernard

Zach Messitte, “As nationalism surges, Italy must reckon with its fascist past“, The Washington Post

Paul Mason, “Reading Arendt Is Not Enough“, NY Books

Samuel Clowes Huneke, “Gay Liberation Beyond the Iron Curtain“, Boston Review

Shakar Rahav, “May Fourth for the World“, China Channel

Meghna Chaudhuri

Adam Shatz, “Trump’s America, Netanyahu’s Israel“, LRB

Nikhil Menon, “Jumbo Exports: India’s history of elephant diplomacy“, The Caravan

David Ciepley, “Wayward Leviathans: How America’s corporations lost their public purpose“, The Hedgehog Review

Sarah Franklin, “Nostalgic Nationalism: How a Discourse of Sacrificial Reproduction Helped Fuel Brexit Britain“, Cultural Anthropology

Rustam Khan

Michael Welton, “Navigating the Intricacies of Habermas“, Counter Punch

Prankaj Mishra, “The Mask It Wears“, LRB

Antonia Weiss and Tim Verlaan, “From Miers to Bjarke: Ten Moments in the Manly History of the Architect’s Model“, Failed Architecture

What We’re Reading This Week

Diego Rivera, Agrarian Leader Zapata, 1931 (Source: MOMA)

Sean Phillips

David Edgerton, “A misremembered Empire“, Tortoise Media

Heidi Tworek, “Information Warfare is Here to Stay”, Foreign Affairs

Rob Gilhooly, “Defining the Heisei Era: Just how peaceful were the past 30 years?“, The Japan Times

Editorial Board, “In Paraguay, Long a Haven for Corruption, Popular Protests Get Results“, New York Times.

David Agren, “Mexico battles over legacy of revolutionary Emiliano Zapata“, The Guardian

Yehor Brailian

Alexander Lee, “Jerk, an Authentic Taste of Jamaican Liberty“, History Today

Madhuri Karak, “Mahatma Gandhi, Master Mediator“, JSTOR DAILY

Adam Higginbotham, “Chernobyl: 7 People Who Played a Crucial Role in the World’s Worst Nuclear Disaster“, History Today

Dexter Govan

Michael Sonenscher, “The Politics of Old Europe“, LBR Blog 

Zeinab Badawi, “Women, hopeful for change, are driving Sudan’s uprising”Financial Times 

Michael Prodger, “An act of faith: resurrecting Notre Dame“, New Statesman

Joan Redmond, “My London history students’ knowledge of Ireland is, at times, shocking“, Irish Times 

Anna Coote, “Universal basic income doesn’t work. Let’s boost the public realm instead“, The Guardian