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Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, World History, Utah State University

For  world historians looking for an academic position, here is a recent call for applications for a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow position at Utah State University. The call for papers explains more: The Department of History at Utah State University invites applications for a one-year (non-renewable) postdoctoral teaching fellow in World History for the 2018-2019 academic…

CFP: “LAGlobal Symposium: The Global Past and Future of Latin American Studies” (21 MARCH, 2018, London)

For those interested in Latin American studies, here’s a recent call for papers for a symposium titled “LAGlobal Symposium: The Global Past and Future of Latin American Studies.” The call for papers explains more: This one-day international symposium will address the global dimensions of Latin American Studies, past, present and future. Contrary to common and…

PhD Opportunity, “Women and the History of International Thought”

PhD Student Opportunity: Women and the History of International Thought, University of Sussex Deadline: February 14, 2018 Start date: September/October 2018 Project Description The PhD researcher will recover and evaluate women’s contributions to the International Relations discipline in the United States, from the end of World War I until 1979. Although disciplinary history is a…

What We’re Reading This Week

FATMA ALADAĞ Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins, “Do Secularism and Gender Equality Really Go Hand in Hand?,” The Guardian. Matthew Hedstrom, “Comparison and Classification in American Religious History,” The Immanent Frame. Emile Chabal, “Les Anglo-Saxons,” Aeon. Minayo Nasiali, “Building Social Space in Marseille,” Global Urban History Blog. CHRIS SZABLA Ralph Jennings, “Taiwan Has Statues of Him Everywhere. Now Many Want…

What We’re Reading This Week

JOSHUA MILSTEIN Victoria Pashentseva, “Tough Lessons in Transnistria,” openDemocracy. Rebeka Foley, “Azerbaijan’s Pre-Soviet Independence Embroiled in Post-Soviet Polemics,” Eurasianet. Francis P. Sempa, “Surviving the Future: Looking Back at the Toynbee-Wakaizumi Dialogue of 1970,” The Diplomat. Martin Doerry, “Meine Geschichte ist eigentlich undenkbar,” [“My Story is Inconceivable”] Der Spiegel. JAMES PARKER James McDougall, “The History of Empire…

Protectionism and Empire: An Interview with Marc-William Palen

‘Free Trade England Wants the Earth.’ Pro-Republican Judge magazine depicts US protectionism shielding the country from the British free trade spider’s grasp, 27 Oct. 1888. Source: he ‘Conspiracy’ of Free Trade: The Anglo-American Struggle Over Empire and Economic Globalisation, 1846-1896 (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

The last twenty-four months have witnessed world-wide dissent against the current regime of trade liberalisation. The United States disengaged from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Britons renounced the EU, and in Tokyo, Sydney, Lima, and other cities across the Pacific Rim thousands protested a potential transpacific trade partnership. While the popularity of protectionism is not unexpected, its recent embrace by political elites everywhere is more surprising. This is particularly true of the United States, which one president ago was still steering the global economy towards freer trade.

In The ‘Conspiracy’ of Free Trade: The Anglo-American Struggle Over Empire and Economic Globalisation, 1846-1896 (Cambridge University Press, 2016), Marc-William Palen traces the roots of this debate to the United States in the 1840s. There began a political and ideological battle between Victorian free trade cosmopolitanism and economic nationalism which lasted the remainder of the century and beyond. Talks about tariffs dominated American political life. Through them, Palen is able to tell a much broader story. The Republican and Democratic parties were transformed in the process. Debates about trade influenced the character of American imperial and commercial expansion, as well as the contours of the Anglo-American struggle for empire and globalisation. Palen’s argument that economic nationalism dominated the period also forces us to rethink received notions of the US Gilded Age, which is usually portrayed as an era dominated by laissez-faire and free trade.

We recently met with Marc-William Palen in Bristol, where he resides. He discussed nineteenth century American political thought, the political economy of Anglo-American globalisation and empire in the Victorian Era, and his future research plans. Dr Palen is a historian at the University of Exeter. The ‘Conspiracy’ of Free Trade is his first book. You can follow him via Twitter: @MWPalen.

Martin Crevier

CFP: Workshop on “Altruism and Its Discontents: Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development”, NACBS Annual Meeting, Providence, RI, October 25-28, 2018.

Theme: “Altruism and Its Discontents: Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development” Proposal deadline: February 15, 2018 Materials: CV and 1-page abstract This workshop will explore human rights, humanitarianism, and development in the modern period, c. 1800-2000, through the prism of “altruism.” While usually treated separately, each of these areas of endeavor grapples with often competing interests…

Submission Deadline Extended: Global Histories (January 20th, 2018)

Global Histories has extended the deadline for its most recent call for papers. The deadline for submissions is now January 20th, 2018. The Call explains more: In recent years, global history has become one of the most ambitious and promising strands of historical research. The approach targets relations, flows, and actors that challenge the assumption of the…

What We’re Reading This Week

LOTTE HOUWINK TEN CATE Jenna Tonn, “White Feminism and Eugenics: The Case of Gertrude Davenport,” The New Inquiry. Colin Koopman, “The Power Thinker,” Aeon. Sadia Shephard, “Foreign-Returned,” The New Yorker. Thijs Kleinpaste, “Botsende vocabulaires,” [“Clashing Vocabularies”] De Groene Amsterdammer. NAGOTHUA NARESH KUMAR Michael Auslin, “Japan’s Endless Search for Modernity,” The Atlantic. Tobias P. Graf, “Best of Enemies: Europeans…