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Apply to Be an Global History Blog Editor-At-Large!

The Toynbee Prize Foundation (TPF) invites applications for Editors-at-Large for its Global History Blog. Through its website, TPF promotes both long-form interviews and articles on the field of global history produced by TPF’s Executive Director as well as shorter-form material that is nonetheless of interest to audiences interested in developments in the field: job postings, cross-postings of material from blogs, and recently-published articles in the field. Working with staff from the Toynbee Foundation and George Mason’s Center for History and New Media, Editors-at-Large will nominate pre-curated content for posting on the Toynbee Foundation’s website via the Foundation’s WordPress PressForward plug-in. Content nominated by the Editors-at-Large will then be forwarded to TPF Editors, who will write the introduction / commentary on selected pieces. Candidates who distinguish themselves may receive the opportunity to write commentary themselves or, eventually, to produce their own in-depth content for the website.

This is an excellent opportunity for graduate students wishing to gain more exposure to one of the most vibrant fields in the discipline today, but undergraduates with a strong interest in history are also welcome to apply. Professors teaching courses in global history who wish to involve their students in the field by nominating them to serve as Editors-at-Large at Large are also welcome to apply. Applicants are invited to use the form at the Editors-at-Large page of the Foundation’s website to apply, sending in (a) a 300-word biography, (b) a 300-word statement of motivation, and (c) a link to a post that they think would be of interest to TPF’s readership. Applications will be assessed on a rolling basis, but successful candidates will be able to start immediately. Questions about the position can be addressed to toynbeefoundation@gmail.com.

You can find detailed instructions on how to apply at this page, also available through the “Participate” drop-down menu on the upper right of your browser window.

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PhD Scholarship in International History at the University of Geneva

The Department of General History and the Global Studies Institute at the University of Geneva have made the following announcement for a PhD scholarship in Contemporary History with an application deadline of January 5, 2015. The call for applications, issued in French, reads as follows:

Le Département d’histoire générale et le Global Studies Institute de l’Université de Genève mettent au concours  un poste d’assistant(e) en histoire contemporaine.
Conditions :
- être en possession d’une maîtrise en histoire (avec spécialisation en histoire contemporaine) ou titre équivalent,
- compétences linguistiques : français et compréhension écrite et orale de l’anglais et d’une autre langue,
- avoir un projet de recherche convaincant dans le domaine d’histoire des relations internationales et/ou transnationale et susceptible d’amener à l’obtention d’un doctorat à l’Université de Genève.
Cahier des charges :
Il s’agit d’un poste à 7/10e qui passera à 10/10e la troisième année. Le ou la titulaire du poste sera chargé-e de 2 heures hebdomadaires de séminaire au niveau B.A. dans les programmes de Relations internationales et d’Histoire générale. L’assistant(e) participera à l’encadrement des étudiants et à la gestion des examens. Il ou elle consacrera au moins 40 % de son temps à la préparation d’une thèse de doctorat en histoire contemporaine.
Traitement :
Fr 46’247.– par an en 1ère année pour un(e) assistant(e) au bénéfice d’une maîtrise. Le maximum du traitement est atteint après 4 annuités (Fr 78’528.– par an).
Entrée en fonction :
1er février 2015
Durée du mandat :
L’assistant(e) est nommé(e) pour une première période de 2 ans; la nomination est renouvelable pour deux périodes successives, respectivement de 2 ans et de 1 an.
Documents requis et délai pour le dépôt des candidatures :
- une lettre de candidature,
- 3 exemplaires du curriculum vitae,
- une photocopie du diplôme de licence ou de maîtrise,
- un projet de thèse.
Dans une perspective de parité, l’Université encourage les candidatures féminines.

Questions about the opportunity may be directed to Professor Matthias Schulz.

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Two New Global History Jobs

In the middle of job market season, two recent postings may interest readers. At Exeter College (a constituent College at the University of Oxford), the Bennett Boskey Fellowship in Extra-European History Since 1500 offers a 36-month post-doctoral fellowship among the dreaming spires. “The position,” notes the announcement,

will be for a period of 36 months (subject to satisfactory progress). It is a fixed-term, non-renewable post, which is intended to provide an opportunity for an outstanding academic at an early stage in their career.
The main duties of the post are to undertake tutorial or class teaching of undergraduates of Exeter College and the Williams College Visiting Students programme, up to a maximum of six (‘weighted’) hours per week averaged over the three eight-week Terms of the academic year; to engage in advanced study and research; to set and mark College examinations; to submit termly reports on students taught; to provide pastoral care for students; to participate in the undergraduate admissions process; to undertake such duties as may reasonably be required to support the teaching of History at the College; and to participate in the governance of the College.

More details (including the further particulars) are available at the link above.

Meanwhile, the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva advertises an Assistant Professorship in International History. The optimal candidate, the advertisement notes, will have a specialization in one or more of the following areas:

• History of International Governance and Systems – critical (non-institutional) history of international organisations, history of international relations, history of international systems and governance beyond the transatlantic world
• History of Transnational Actors and Actions – history of transnational movements, history of protests and revolutions, whether in the context of religious or secular politics
• History of Cultures, Societies and Markets in a Regional or Global Perspective – history of culture in the context of international history, with an emphasis on religion and identity, and history of political regimes and ideologies; international development policies and their relation to societies and markets in a regional and/or global perspective. In particular, questions pertaining to the evolution of development policy ideas and tools, but also broad transversal themes with strong interdisciplinary appeal: property rights, environment, health and food.

Further details can be found at the Graduate Institute’s website.

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Sven Beckert on the “Empire of Cotton”

Sven Beckert’s Empire of Cotton: it’s one of the most keenly anticipated works of history this year, and you can read an adapted excerpt here at The Atlantic.

The Toynbee Prize Foundation will be featuring an in-depth review of the book in weeks to come–we’re busy preparing a number of other Interviews with Global Historians–but readers interested in getting an idea of this ambitious, important work are strongly suggested to check out this except from Empire of Cotton: A Global History.

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Glenda Sluga (Sydney) To Give Masters Classes in Global History at UCLA in January 2015

An announcement over from our colleagues at the University of Sydney’s Laureate Research Program in International History: over the course of three sessions in January 2015, Professor Glenda Sluga will be giving a three-session workshop on International History and the History of the Human Rights, to be held at the University of California, Los Angeles. “In Europe, the United States, and increasingly in Australia,” reads the announcement,

a revival of scholarly interest in all things ‘international’ is pushing historical research into new directions. A decade after Lynn Hunt, as President of the American Historical Association, predicted that diplomatic history would be the ‘next big thing’, it is the broader reach of international history that is captivating historical imaginations. This ‘international turn’ includes the study of foreign policy, but its methodologies and themes are richer than we could have expected, feeding into histories of imperialism, colonialism, feminism, economics, women, the national as well as the transnational and global.  

The workshops–titled “Tracking the International Turn,” “Applying the International Turn,” and “Elaborating the International Turn”–will be devoted to unpacking what, exactly, a turn towards the international scale might mean. Given Sluga’s extensive work within the field, these events should be a draw for any interested readers in Southern California–and some outside of it, too.

The three meetings are on January 9th, 16th, and 23rd. More information can be found on the flyer here. The organizers note that pre-registration (more information at the links) is required, although participants will be required to submit a short statement of their own interests. Course credit will be available for those who require it; a light lunch, for all.

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Professor of International Studies with a Specialization in Global History at Leiden University

The Leiden University Institute for History is seeking applications for  a full professor of International Studies with a specialization in Global History.

From the announcement:

The successful applicant will especially contribute to the BA / MA programmes in International Studies, and other programs and courses as required. (S)he will hold an appointment at the Leiden University Institute for History and will be based in The Hague and Leiden.

  • Original research involving primary sources within the broad framework of ‘Global History’;
  • Teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, in lecture and seminar formats; primarily in International Studies BA and MA programs;
  • Initiation and supervision of postgraduate research;
  • Acquisition of project funding at the national, European and international level;
  • Contribution to administration on various levels of academic leadership;
  • Representation of the field to external audiences and media.

Selection criteria

We seek a scholar of wide intellectual scope. Specialization in terms of region and themes is open, but we are particularly interested in candidates with a demonstrable transnational perspective in research and teaching, who focuses on contemporary, i.e. post-1945, global history.

We expect the successful candidate to have:

  • Excellent research qualities, visible in a PhD degree (preferably in History) and a high-quality, internationally acces­sible re­search and publication record;
  • Demonstrable commitment to high-quality teaching practice, and broad teaching scope and thesis supervision;
  • Disciplinary expertise in History, openness to interdisciplinary cooperation; and the ability to integrate his/her disciplinary knowledge with regional-historical perspectives;
  • Ability to acquire funding for and manage international research projects;
  • Demonstrated administrative, management and leadership abilities;
  • An excellent command of English. If the successful candidate is not Dutch-speaking, s/he is expected to have acquired a good command of Dutch within two years from taking up duty. The Faculty will make resources available to this end.

About our faculty and institute

The Faculty of Humanities is rich in expertise in fields as philosophy, history, art history, arts, literature, linguistics, religion studies and regional studies covering nearly every region of the world. Located in the historical centre of Leiden, our faculty is home to more than 5400 students and 800 staff members. It offers an inspiring and international work environment. For more information, see http://www.hum.leidenuniv.nl.

Institute for History

The Leiden Institute for History is one of the seven research institutes of the Faculty of Humanities. The Institute was ranked 28th among history departments in the 2014 QS World University Ranking. The Institute’s strong international orientation and focus on the study of European, American, Asian and African societies in a global context gives the Institute its unique character. For more information see http://www.hum.leiden.edu/history

‘International Studies’ is a new programme which studies the political, cultural, historical and economic developments in various regions of the world, in their mutual dependence. International Studies started in September 2012, and it attracts a wide, international student body. The programme consists of a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree and is taught in English. The BA programme is housed in The Hague; the MA programme is based in Leiden. For more information see http://www.bachelors.leiden.edu/studies/info/international-studies and http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/international-studies/en/programme

Terms and conditions

The successful candidate is eligible for a permanent, fulltime appointment (38 hrs per week), provided his or her suitability is determined on the basis of previous experience as a full professor, and provided s/he has successfully completed a tenure track. In other cases an appointment is initially for a period of five years, convertible into a permanent position pending satisfactory performance. The preferred appointment date is August 1, 2015.

The gross monthly salary is set on € 5.003,- to 7.285 per month, commensurate with qualifications and based upon a fulltime employment and in conformity with current salary scales under the collective employment agreement (CAO) for Dutch Universities. Leiden University offers an attractive benefits package with additional holiday (8%) and end-of-year bonuses(8.3 %), training and career development and sabbatical leave. Our individual choices model gives you some freedom to assemble your own set of terms and conditions. Candidates from outside the Netherlands may be eligible for a substantial tax break.

Procedure

The candidate will be asked to give a lecture as part of the application procedure, and may be required to participate in a management assessment.

Information

Queries to Prof. Wim van den Doel, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities (h.w.van.den.doel@hum.leidenuniv.nl), with cc. to Prof. André Gerrits (a.w.m.gerrits@hum.leidenuniv.nl), chair of the International Studies degree.

Applications

Applications should be in English, and electronically be submitted in a PDF-document, named ‘Family name – given name – vacancy number’. This document should include, in this order:

  • CV including education and employment history, publications, courses devised / taught (including assessments), grant and awards, and linguistic capabilities;
  • A letter of motivation including a personal vision of International Studies with a specialization in Global History within the context of International Studies (2 pages max.);
  • Names, positions and email addresses of three referees (no reference letters);
  • A research agenda including titles and outlines of (potential) individual or team projects (2 pages max.)
  • A teaching statement relevant to International Studies at BA and MA level (2 pages max.).

Please submit your application (with the vacancy number mentioned in the letter of motivation and in the subject line of the e-mail) before December 15, 2014, to Leerstoelen@hum.leidenuniv.nl

Vacancy number: 14-301

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Assistant Professor in Global History at the Memorial University of Newfoundland

The Department of History at the Memorial University of Newfoundland is seeking applications for an Assistant Professor in Global History which will commence on July 1, 2015. The application deadline is December 15, 2014, and interested applicants should visit the application announcement.

From the announcement:

Our department currently has a full-time complement of 15 and this position is one of three additional positions we are seeking to fill this academic year. Memorial University has an excellent research library and is home to the Maritime History Archive, the largest collection of merchant marine records in the world.

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching and supervision. Conditions of employment are governed by the collective agreement available at www.mun.ca/munfa. Applicants are expected to hold a PhD degree in a relevant field by the time of appointment. If a successful candidate has not completed an earned doctorate, he/she shall be appointed to a regular term, non-renewable three-year appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor. If the candidate completes all the requirements for the doctorate during the first 24 months of the term appointment, he/she shall begin a tenure-track appointment following completion of the requirements of the degree.

Applicants are requested to send a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, a statement of current and future research interests, a teaching dossier, a writing sample, and three letters of reference to Prof. Terry Bishop Stirling, Head, Department of History, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada, A1C 5S7; Fax: (709) 864-2164; e-mail: tstirlin@mun.ca. More information about this job opportunity can be found here.

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Peace Without Victory: Adam Tooze on “The Deluge: The Great War, America, and the Remaking of the Global Order 1916-1931″

In case you haven’t noticed, this year marks the 100-year anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War. Visit a bookstore, and you’re likely to be greeted at the entrance by scores of books devoted to explaining how the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand sparked a European conflagration. Search beyond the piles at the front of the store, and, if you’re lucky, you may even find books that explore the war outside of its European context.

But in a year full of books devoted to the centenary of the war, few works have been so eagerly anticipated as that of historian Adam Tooze, whose The Deluge: The Great War, America, and the Remaking of the Global Order 1916-1931 has recently appeared on bookshelves on both sides of the Atlantic. Tooze has long been well-known to specialists on European economic and intellectual history since his earlier work on statistics and state-making in Germany. To more general readers, however, he may be better known for his 2008 The Wages of Destruction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy, which secured his reputation as one of the leading historians of German and European history writing today.

Cover image of Adam Tooze's new book, "The Deluge"
Cover image of Adam Tooze’s new book, “The Deluge”

Economic history may have a reputation as dusty, dry, and, well, boring in some quarters today. But in Wages, Tooze showed how an economic history perspective was crucial to understanding Nazi grand strategy and even the origins of the Holocaust itself. More than that, Wages relocated the pivotal place of the United States in the worldview of Adolf Hitler and other leading Nazi figures. As the United States emerged as a qualitatively new force in global affairs, anyone seeking to shape the global order had to draw lessons from the new colossus. Figures like Hitler recognized that “American economic might would be the decisive factor in the shaping of the world order.” More than that, the American challenge was a new political and economic formation on a new scale, “a consolidated federal republic of continental scale, a super-sized nation state” that, thanks to its might and geography, “had a unique claim and capacity to exert global influence.”

The American entrance into European and global affairs really took on full shape concomitant to the First World War–an insight that drives much of The Deluge, and which explains its temporal framing. 1916 was the year when American economic output exceeded that of the British Empire, 1931 the year of Herbert Hoover’s moratorium on war debts. As commentators today question whether we might be entering a “post-American century,” understanding how the American giant burst onto the global scene in the first place is all the more urgent. The Toynbee Prize Foundation had the opportunity to sit down with Tooze recently to discuss his path to history, the book, and his future projects for this installment of Global History Forum.

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The Sino-Soviet Split and the Left as Global History: An Interview with Jeremy Friedman

Among the crimes cartographical and otherwise perpetrated by the Mercator projection, the Cold War projection of an Asia dominated by the Soviet Union and the People’s Republic of China numbers among the most egregious. Famous for inflating land areas the further away they were from the Equator, when applied to the world of the early 1950s, the map projection made it seem as if the Communist world was monolithic. The greater part of Asia was covered with red ink, while the freedom-loving (and less cartographically distorted) blue fields of the earth shrunk before the grim crimson blob stretching from Berlin to Vietnam.

Of course, the “Communist world” was never as unified and cohesive as the mapmakers suggested. While the Soviet vision of proletarian workers unifying to overthrow capitalist oppressors and the Maoist vision of peasant armies challenging imperialists from from Hanoi to Havana seemed to march in lockstep to Cold Warriors, by the early 1960s, the two socialist powers came to irreconcilable differences. Soviet advisers were expelled from Beijing as Chinese leaders castigated the Soviets for making peace with the imperialist Americans; Soviet leaders denounced Mao as a revisionist and a nationalist.

But the Sino-Soviet Split, as it is called in English and Russian (“Sino-Soviet Hostility” in Chinese – zhōng sū jiāo’è), had ramifications that went far beyond the oceans of red dye spilled by the Mercator projections. As country after country “the Third World” gained independence, the Soviets and the Chinese were among the few major powers that offered compelling developmental – and historical narratives – to fledgling nations. But what would the meaning of Revolution be in a decolonizing world? Was Revolution really about anti-capitalism, as the Soviets argued? Or was the real essence of Revolution opposition to empire, as their Chinese rivals put forward? How did the Chinese challenge affect the Soviet outreach to the Third World, and vice-versa? And what was the effect of the Sino-Soviet Split on the intellectual repertoire of a global Left?

Jeremy Friedman, whose work forms the basis of this latest installment of the Global History Forum. Image courtesy of Yale University Office of Public Affairs and Communications
Jeremy Friedman, whose work forms the basis of this latest installment of the Global History Forum. Image courtesy of Yale University Office of Public Affairs and Communications

These are among just some of the questions at the heart of the work of Dr. Jeremy Friedman, our guest in this latest installment of the Global History Forum. Friedman, the Associate Director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy at Yale University, is the author of the forthcoming Shadow Cold War, scheduled to appear with the University of North Carolina Press next year, in 2015. Global History Forum spoke with Jeremy recently to discuss his intellectual journey thus far, the book, and a forthcoming project on the history of the Third World.

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New Atlas of Global History Institutions

Followers of the Toynbee Prize Foundation will recall that we unveiled this current version of our website this autumn after extensive revision and collaboration with the fantastic staff at George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Along with that re-design has come new features, like our periodical Interviews with Global Historians.

As we continue to expand the site’s functionality, we’re happy to announce a new page–an “atlas” of global history institutions that you can either find here or via the drop-down menu under “Participate,” in the top-right hand corner of your browser window.

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