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CFP: “The Economic Impact of the Portuguese Expansion in Europe (14th-17th centuries)” (Lisboa, Portugal, November 24-26, 2016)

If you’re interested in the global history of economic, here’s a recent call for applications that will surely be of interest. The Portuguese Center for Global History (CHAM) , has organized a conference entitled “The Economic Impact of the Portuguese Expansion in Europe (14th-17th centuries)” will be taking place at Lisbon on November 24-26, 2016.

Here’s how the call for applications describes it:

Five centuries after its beginning (1415), it is necessary to evaluate the real economic impact of the European Expansion in its origins and destinies, breaking boundaries and building the foundations of what is understood as the first global age. This evaluation is based on the need to review this phenomenon, confronting the recent historiographic production which has minimized the economic repercussions of the European Expansion before the 19th century, notwithstanding some positive historiographic reappraisal made recently, at least in the case of Portugal. This discussion only makes sense if a comparative approach between European and extra-European realities is adopted.

Although not an exclusive European phenomenon, the Overseas Expansion made a deep change in Western Europe, revealing a multiform, complex and long-lasting nature in its place of origin and of arrival. Therefore, the aim of this congress is to re-evaluate the Portuguese Expansion from the 14th century to the 17th century, without overlooking its Medieval origins, as well as its extra-European contributions, from a plural and transdisciplinary approach but giving priority to an economic perspective.

The organizers invite you to contribute for this re-evaluation by addressing one of the following issues:
– Commercial networks, economic agents and trading companies;
– Development of trade cultures and techniques;
– Products and methods of economic exploration: continuities and inovation;
– Trade cities and societies: tensions, cooperation and quotidian;
– The impact of commerce and navigation on production and circulation of scientific and technological knowledge.

Interested? You should prepare proposals to be sent to novasfronteirasculturas@gmail.com with name, email address, institutional affiliation, title of paper and abstract of 250 words maximum, with 4 keywords in Portuguese, Spanish, English, French or Italian. The deadline for submitting papers is July 29, 2016.

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Doctoral Position, The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (Berlin, Germany)

Open positions continue to abound for historians working on global history of knowledge. Here’s another attractive – and last-minute–  job opportunity announced from the The Max Planck Institute for the History of Science at Germany for a doctoral position, with the possibility of staying on for up to three years. The call for applications explains:

The topic of the candidate’s dissertation should complement the research undertaken in the project “Globalization Processes of Knowledge” and in the junior research group “Asian Impacts on the Globalization of Knowledge: Marine Resources during the Cold War.”

The position will be based at both the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and the Freie Universität in Berlin. The conferral of the doctorate is expected to take place at the Freie Universität Berlin.

The projects “Globalization Processes of Knowledge” and “Asian Impacts on the Globalization of Knowledge” seek to cooperate on a contribution to the global history of knowledge – with an approach to history that doesn’t rely on a one-sided diffusion model, but instead understands transfer processes as multilateral transformations of knowledge systems. The aim is to investigate the dynamics of such transformation processes using a historical theory on the evolution of knowledge as well as through approaches from the field of the global history of science. The project’s central question is twofold: First, it asks which political, economic, and cultural conditions shape processes of the globalization of knowledge? And secondly, what effects do these globalization processes subsequently have on the societal contexts in which they take place? Bearing these goals in mind, we are looking for a doctoral project that incorporates both multilateral relations and global conditionality.

Suggested Topics for the Dissertation Project:

Living and nonliving (marine) resources (e.g. fish, plankton, pearls, or submarine crude oil, manganese, gas), or, for instance, nuclear energy, electricity, or wood could serve as starting points for an investigation into corresponding phenomena such as development aid, resource conflict, or environment and animal protection.

Of particular interest are projects that consider bi- or multilateral relations within Asia (e.g. Japan-India, India-China, China-Russia, Japan-Korea, Korea-China), or between (East) Asia and South America or Africa, respectively (e.g. “South-South” cooperation). Projects that deal with other regions and multilateral alliances – in particular Southeast Asia – are extremely welcome.

Expected Area of Focus:

  • We are looking for a doctoral candidate who is interested in writing their doctoral thesis within the context of the cooperation between the Max Plank Institute for the History of Science and the research group “East Asian Impacts on the Globalization of Knowledge: Marine Resources during the Cold War.”
  • The thesis should use multilateral perspectives to examine the interaction between processes in the globalization of knowledge and societal conditions – in other words, the project should bear in mind the global contingency of local phenomena.
  • The candidate will be expected to either contribute to the development of the theoretical framework of a historical theory on the evolution of knowledge, or to engage the methodological and theoretical issues of the global history of knowledge.
  • The candidate is expected to undertake archival work and research trips (financed).
  • Discussion and exchange within the projects will form a key part of the research process.

Necessary Qualifications:

  • Completed university degree (MA level) in History, the History of Science, Economic History, Regional Studies, or a related field.

Applicants with the following qualifications are particularly welcome:

  • Knowledge of either Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Russian – especially reading skills for the purpose of archival work.
  • Familiarity with the theoretical approaches of historical epistemology, global and knowledge history, as well as with the theories of cultural evolution.
  • Ability to produce academic publications in English

If this sounds interesting, consider applying. As the call explains, “applications should including a CV, a letter of motivation, a copy of the applicant’s MA certificate or verification that the applicant’s thesis has already been submitted, a digital copy of the applicant’s MA thesis in the form of a PDF, and proof of language abilities, if available.” Applications should be submitted online here no later than July 24, 2016; those with questions should address them to Prof. Dr. Nadin Heé (nadin.hee@fu-berlin.de)

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Thicker Than Water: Revisiting Global Connections on the Banks of the Suez Canal with Valeska Huber

Thanks to the haze of time, the first great age of globalization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century can sometimes seem like a golden age. It’s true that we live in an age of unprecedentedly inexpensive air travel, cell phones and Skype often replacing long travel to business meetings, and financial management tools making it easier to speculate on the ups and downs of the S&P or Nikkei, the ruble or the euro. But perhaps as we find ourselves bogged down by the kinks in this new post-1970s world of re-globalization–the passport checks, the baggage fees, the broken connections–it’s all the easier to reimagine the world of high imperialism, a lost golden age. Chroniclers like Stefan Zweig and John Maynard Keynes chronicled the time as an age in which

The inhabitant of London could order by telephone, sipping his morning tea in bed, the various products of the whole earth, in such quantity as he might see fit, and reasonably expect their early delivery upon his doorstep; he could at the same moment and by the same means adventure his wealth in the natural resources and new enterprises of any quarter of the world, and share, without exertion or even trouble, in their prospective fruits and advantages; or he could decide to couple the security of his fortunes with the good faith of the townspeople of any substantial municipality in any continent that fancy or information might recommend. He could secure forthwith, if he wished it, cheap and comfortable means of transit to any country or climate without passport or other formality, could despatch his servant to the neighboring office of a bank for such supply of the precious metals as might seem convenient, and could then proceed abroad to foreign quarters, without knowledge of their religion, language, or customs, bearing coined wealth upon his person, and would consider himself greatly aggrieved and much surprised at the least interference.

There was perhaps no more potent symbol of this world of ultra-connectivity than the Suez Canal, built in what was still Ottoman Egypt in 1869 and connecting the Red Sea with the Mediterranean. The Canal increased world trade. It also  soon became a vital strategic artery for the British Empire, since it made the “passage to India” via intermediary stations like Suez and Aden far shorter than the former trip around the Cape of Good Hope. So powerful was the imaginary of the Canal as one of the crucial changes of the epoch that, when Henry Morton Stanley finally located David Livingstone (of “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”) on the shores of Lake Tanganyika in 1871, the Canal was the first thing that came to Stanley’s mind when Livingstone asked him what had changed in the world during his many years out of contact with the Western world.

Channelling Mobilities (Cambridge UP, 2015), the recent book of Valeska Huber (German Historical Institute London)
Channelling Mobilities (Cambridge UP, 2015), the recent book of Valeska Huber (German Historical Institute London)

Yet as Dr. Valeska Huber, a research fellow at the German Historical Institute in London, shows in her recent book Channelling Mobilities: Migration and Globalization in the Suez Canal Region and Beyond (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, paperback 2015), the Suez Canal did not so much open as channel migration and globalization during this world of increasing trade and economic integration.

Sure, the opening of the Canal made it easier for passengers—that is, especially if they were white, wealthy, British, or best, all three—to travel around the world, often unencumbered by passport checks. But our popular memory of the Canal often forgets the fact that building a giant channel of water in the middle of the Egyptian desert obstructed the migratory routes of Bedouin tribes who formerly moved from east to west. More fundamentally, the very opening of the Canal and the transformation of the region into a giant transportation hub gave rise to new worries about the movement of slaves, prostitutes, Muslim “fanatics,” or disease across the region. Contemporary fears that cholera originated in India led to the imposition of quarantine and disease control regimes along the shores of the Red Sea. At the same time, shipping titans and imperial bureaucrats debated the wisdom of dividing shipping routes’ staffing between Asians (for the hot and sticky days of shipping through the Indian Ocean, supposedly unbearable for the “white race”) and Europeans (so as to avoid the problem of Asian or Arab crews outstaying their welcome in Southampton or the London docklands). The Canal channeled as much as it connected.

Huber’s work is, then, valuable not only as an intervention into the field of Middle Eastern Studies, relying as it does on British, French, and Egyptian archives. It constitutes a welcome foray into the broader conversation about the history of globalization and the history of the late nineteenth century as a time not only of increasing connectivity, but also of increasing channelling—that is, processes and institutions whereby migration of goods and people is cordoned off, classified, or restricted, often relying on distinctions of race, sex, or level of civilization. In order to discuss Channelling Mobilities more with Dr. Huber, Toynbee Prize Foundation Executive Director Dr. Timothy Nunan (TN) made use of the twenty-first century’s aforementioned telephonic tools to speak with Dr. Huber (VH) across oceans–fitting, given that telegraphic cables were just one of many pieces of infrastructure to cross the Suez Canal during the period her book studies. Continue reading

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Associate Professor in Modern Political and Economic History, 1870-2000 (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim)

As we enter the job-posting season, here’s one position at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology that may be of interest to many readers. NTNU, as it is called, and which is located in Trondheim (Norway’s fourth-largest city), has announced a search for an Associate Professor in Modern Political and Economic History, with a preferred specialization in the political economy of natural resources in a global perspective.

Does this sound like you? If so, read on:

Applications are invited for a tenure-track Associate Professorship in Modern Political and Economic History, 1870-2000 at the Department of Historical Studies, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. Information about the Department can be found at http://www.ntnu.edu/ihs. The position is part of the Onsager Fellowship Program.

The position will be associated with the research group working on modern political and economic history at the Department of Historical Studies. In its research, the group is especially focusing on the political economy of natural resources in a global perspective. A key aim is to develop systematic historical knowledge about the role of natural resources in economic and societal development. The Department hosts several research projects on natural resources, and the Onsager Fellow will thus be a part of a research team of 12-14 historians.

To further strengthen the work of the group we are seeking a candidate working on the global political economy of natural resources in the modern period (ca. 1870-2000). The new position will be at the level of associate professor. Applicants should hold a PhD in history or related fields and have a strong publication record within political, economic, and/or business history.

Besides doing research, the successful applicant is expected to give courses and supervise students at bachelor, master and PhD level. It is expected that the successful applicant will contribute to key research and educational activities at the Department. Research activities are expected to have a strong international profile and impact.

During the tenure track period of 6-7 years, the successful applicant will receive professional guidance, training and advice by mentors appointed by the faculty to build a successful academic career. In addition, the candidate will have no teaching load for the first year of employment. The candidate will be subject to a mid-career assessment after 3 years, and a final tenure assessment after no more than 6 years. It is expected that the candidate will qualify for a full professorship at the end of the tenure-track period.

The appointee will be given the opportunity to recruit a Ph.D. student to a three-year full-time doctoral stipend within two years of appointment.

The call for applications explains the specifications of the position at much greater length, but among the most important details are the deadline (September 2, 2016), the pay scale (starting at the equivalent of around $68,000 USD), and how to apply (electronically through the website Jobbnorge, and be marked with the file number for the position, HF 16-032.)

 

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Binational Research Tandem Program in Global and Trans-Regional History (German Historical Institute Washington)

Similar to the other binational research tandem program in the History of Knowledge at the German Historical Institute Washington that we recently published at TPF, here’s another call from that institution in the U.S. capital. As with the other program, binational applications where two applicants – one from Germany, the other from North America – have already identified each other as the most fruitful collaborators are especially welcome.

The call for applications explains more:

 

A member institution of the Max Weber Foundation – International Humanities, the German Historical Institute Washington is a distinguished non-university affiliated historical research institute, conducting inter- and transdisciplinary research with a transatlantic focus. Its fellowship program promotes cutting-edge research in history and related disciplines and international exchange of scholars. For this purpose, the GHI in cooperation with the BMW Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown University is now offering German and North American scholars the opportunity to develop binational research tandems which link up two academics, one from Germany and one from North America, to work on projects which engage with global history or use transregional approaches and contain productive areas of overlap either in their topics or in their conceptional frameworks. The tandem program presents an excellent opportunity for scholars from Germany and North America to develop their expertise by collaborating closely, to work with additional resources and to make connections with others in their fields.

The areas of research the GHI is going to develop in the next years are “History of Knowledge,” “Religion and Ethnicity,” and “Spaces and Symbolic Boundaries.” The institute has also developed a strong interest in “Digital history.” Projects that address one of these fields or relate to them in any way are particularly welcome; we are, however, also happy to consider applications focusing on other topics.

The program is designed for postdoctoral, mid-career, and established historians from Germany and North America. In order to ensure successful collaboration, our preference is for applicants to already have identified their potential tandem partner. We welcome applications from both long-standing binational partnerships as well as from newly created partnerships for the purposes of the fellowship. Preference will also be given to candidates doing original research for a new book project.

Starting in September 2017, the successful applicants will be in residence at the GHI and invited to participate in GHI activities and events. They will be expected to plan and convene a joint conference or workshop, which will be funded by the GHI, as well as to give a public lecture at Georgetown University. The fellows will have the opportunity to make use of the resources in the Washington, DC area, including the Library of Congress and the National Archives, while pursuing their research agendas.

Funding will be provided for a 12-month stay at the German Historical Institute Washington, DC. The monthly stipend will be graded, depending on the academic status applicants will receive:

• €3,000/month for Postdoctoral Scholars / Habilitierende

• €4500/month for Assistant Professors / W1-Professoren

• €5,200/month for Associate Professors / W2-Professoren

• €6,000/month for Professors / W3-Professoren

In addition, fellowship recipients based in Europe will receive reimbursement for their round-trip economy airfare to the US. The GHI regrets that it is unable to provide accommodation for its fellows.

The deadline for applications is August 1, 2016. To apply, please send a cover letter, a CV, a copy of the certificate of your most recently achieved qualification, a research project proposal (5 pages or 2,000 words max), a one-page proposal for a conference or workshop, two samples of your academic writing (an article or a book chapter), and the names and contact details of two referees. While applicants may write in either English or German, we recommend that they use the language in which they are most proficient. We can accept applications in electronic form only. Please submit your documents in a single PDF file to: fellowships@ghi-dc.org

All candidates will be notified in mid-October 2016 of the result of their application.

For more information, please contact: Bryan Hart

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Andrew W. Mellon Chair in History, University of Pittsburgh

As we approach the season of job announcements for the North American market, here’s an early announcement for an endowed Chair at the University of Pittsburgh that should interest senior scholars of Asia:

The Department of History at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for an endowed chair, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of History. The appointment will begin with the fall term 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter. As part of a strategic investment in the history of Asia in the world, the Department wishes to appoint a historian of Asia broadly defined, whose work might focus on Western, Central, East, Southeast, or South Asia, or the Indian Ocean World. We welcome applications from single sub-region specialists as well as from scholars whose work embraces trans-regional approaches. Applications are invited from scholars at the level of advanced associate or full professor who have demonstrated exceptional scholarship and teaching as well as leadership in their field and the profession.

Applicants should submit a letter of interest, a complete C.V. including list of publications, and the names and contact information of three academic referees to https://facultysearch.as.pitt.edu/apply/index/MTUz.

The review of applications will begin on September 6, 2016, and continue until the position is filled. For informal inquiries, please contact the chair of the search committee, Holger Hoock, J. Carroll Amundson Professor, at: hoock@pitt.edu.

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Binational Research Tandem Program in the History of Knowledge and Knowledge Cultures (German Historical Institute Washington)

If you are either a German or North American scholar looking for your next post-doctoral gig — or, better yet, know another person from the other national context in the same position — the German Historical Institute Washington has announced a scheme that is just for you. The German Historical Institute is running a so-called binational research program for scholars working on the history of knowledge. There’s more to learn from the recent call for applications:

A member institution of the Max Weber Foundation – International Humanities, the German Historical Institute Washington is a distinguished non-university affiliated historical research institute, conducting inter- and transdisciplinary research with a transatlantic focus. Its fellowship program promotes cutting-edge research in history and related disciplines and international exchange of scholars. For this purpose, the GHI in cooperation with the BMW Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown University is now offering German and North American scholars the opportunity to develop binational research tandems which link up two academics, one from Germany and one from North America, to work on projects on the history of knowledge, ideally ones which focus on the development of transatlantic perspectives on the issues they examine, and contain productive areas of overlap either in their topics or in their conceptional frameworks. The tandem program presents an excellent opportunity for scholars from Germany and North America to develop their expertise by collaborating closely, to work with additional resources and to make connections with others in their fields.

The program is designed for postdoctoral, mid-career, and established historians from Germany and North America. In order to ensure successful collaboration, our preference is for applicants to already have identified their potential tandem partner. We welcome applications from both long-standing binational partnerships as well as from newly created partnerships for the purposes of the fellowship. Preference will also be given to candidates doing original research for a new book project.

Starting in September 2017, the successful applicants will be in residence at the GHI and invited to participate in GHI activities and events. They will be expected to plan and convene a joint conference or workshop, which will be funded by the GHI, as well as to give a public lecture at Georgetown University. The fellows will have the opportunity to make use of the resources in the Washington, DC area, including the Library of Congress and the National Archives, while pursuing their research agendas.

Funding will be provided for a 12-month stay at the German Historical Institute Washington, DC. The monthly stipend will be graded, depending on the academic status applicants will receive:

€3,000/month for Postdoctoral Scholars / Habilitierende
€4500/month for Assistant Professors / W1-Professoren
€5,200/month for Associate Professors / W2-Professoren
€6,000/month for Professors / W3-Professoren

In addition, fellowship recipients based in Europe will receive reimbursement for their round-trip economy airfare to the US. The GHI regrets that it is unable to provide accommodation for its fellows.

The deadline for applications is August 1, 2016. To apply, please send a cover letter, a CV, a copy of the certificate of your most recently achieved qualification, a research project proposal (5 pages or 2,000 words max), a one-page proposal for a conference or workshop, two samples of your academic writing (an article or a book chapter), and the names and contact details of two referees. While applicants may write in either English or German, we recommend that they use the language in which they are most proficient. We can accept applications in electronic form only. Please submit your documents in a single PDF file to: fellowships@ghi-dc.org

All candidates will be notified in mid-October 2016 of the result of their application. For more information, please contact: Bryan Hart

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Summer School “China in Europe, Europe in China – Past and Present” (University of Hamburg, July 19-21, 2016)

For those readers of the Global History Blog interested in interactions between Europe and China, take note – there’s a summer school taking place at the University of Hamburg from July 19 to July 21, 2016. The summer school devoted to discuss transnational and interdisciplinary approaches on Sino-European interactions in the past and present. The announcement goes into more detail:

The event will bring together PhD students, advanced researchers, and professors from the partner universities Fudan University and Universität Hamburg for a two-and-a-half-day program. With keynote lectures and PhD project presentations, the summer school will provide a platform to discuss transnational and regional ties, interdisciplinary approaches and new findings in the field of Sino-European interactions in the past and present.

Both universities established the graduate school in the autumn of 2013 as part of town twinning initiatives between Hamburg and Shanghai. The graduate school started as a project of the Chinese Studies and History Departments, concentrating on Sino-German relations.

Following last year’s summer school at Fudan University, this year’s event will mark the end of a cycle and the beginning of a new phase: After three years, the first cohort of PhD candidates focusing on Chinese-German historical relations will complete the program. In the future, it will extend its scope to focus on PhD and research projects examining transfer processes between China and Europe. Furthermore, it will look not only at processes in a historical perspective, but will also consider the whole range of the humanities: literary criticism, philosophy, the science of art, musicology, cultural anthropology et cetera. Continue reading

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Three PhD Fellowships in Global History, Georg-August-University Göttingen (Germany)

For readers looking for ways to finance the writing-up of a doctoral dissertation—and based at institutions within the Volkswagen Foundation-funded “Global Network for Global History”—here’s a terrific opportunity at the  Centre for Modern Indian Studies at the University of Göttingen. As a recent announcement explains, the Centre is offering three PhD fellowships in global history beginning January 1, 2017:

The transnational research group “A Global Network for Global History” directed by the Centre for Modern Indian Studies (CeMIS), University of Göttingen in cooperation with the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, and the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, advertises 3 PhD scholarships for the funding period from 1 January – 30 June 2017.

The “Global Network for Global History” is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation and seeks to organize a community of scholars interested in the systematic scrutiny of developments that have unfolded across national, regional, and continental boundaries and who propose to analyze the interconnections – cultural, economic, ecological, political and demographic – among world societies.

PhD Fellows at CeMIS are appointed for six months and are provided time, guidance, office space, and access to the facilities of Göttingen University. They should be prepared to devote their entire time to productive scholarship and may undertake sustained projects of research or other original work. They will join a vibrant interdisciplinary community of scholars at CeMIS and the newly founded Forum for Global and Transregional Studies at the University of Göttingen.

The scholarship is granted for six months and amounts to EUR 1.600 per month (incl. compulsory health insurance and travel allowances). The work location is Göttingen.

Requirements for candidates are:

+ An affiliation with:

o    Delhi University, India
o    Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Senegal
o    East China Normal University, China
o    Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
o    International Institute of Social History, Netherlands
o    Weatherhead Initiative on Global History, Harvard University, USA

+    a master’s degree in History or Social Sciences;

+    independence, individual initiative and commitment;

+    excellent knowledge of English and the languages relevant to the research location;

+    sound knowledge of the relevant scholarly debates

Applications should contain a full CV, copies of relevant examinations, a research proposal (max. 5000 words), a writing sample (a chapter or essay), and the names and addresses of two referees. They should be sent electronically by 31 July 2016 to Prof. Dr. Ravi Ahuja.

Post-doctoral applicants should be aware of the related call for post-doctoral fellowships posted to the Global History Blog recently.

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2 Postdoctoral Fellowships in Global History, Georg-August-University Göttingen (Germany)

For those readers of the Global History Blog looking for ways to finance turning their dissertation into a book,or developing post-doctoral projects more generally, here’s a terrific opportunity at the Georg-August-University Göttingen. The University’s Centre for Modern Indian Studies, part of a broader research network into global history, has announced a call for applications for two post-doctoral fellowship positions beginning January 1, 2017.

For more information, read the announcement below. Note that a command of German is not a requirement for the position:

The transnational research group “A Global Network for Global History” directed by the Centre for Modern Indian Studies (CeMIS), University of Göttingen in cooperation with the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, and the Weatherhead Initiative on Global History, Harvard University, Cambridge MA, advertises 2 Postdoc fellowships for the funding period from 16 January – 30 September 2017.

The “Global Network for Global History” is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation and seeks to organize a community of scholars interested in the systematic scrutiny of developments that have unfolded across national, regional, and continental boundaries and who propose to analyze the interconnections – cultural, economic, ecological, political and demographic – among world societies.

Fellows at CeMIS are appointed for 8.5 months and are provided time, guidance, office space, and access to the facilities of Göttingen University. They should be prepared to devote their entire time to productive scholarship and may undertake sustained projects of research or other original work. They will join a vibrant interdisciplinary community of scholars at CeMIS and the newly founded Forum for Global and Transregional Studies at the University of Göttingen.

The scholarship is granted for 8.5 months and amounts to EUR 2.650 per month (incl. compulsory health insurance and travel allowances). The work location is Göttingen.

Requirements for candidates are:

• a PhD in History or Social Sciences

• independence, individual initiative and commitment

• excellent knowledge of English and the languages relevant to the research location

• sound knowledge of the relevant scholarly debates

Applications should contain a full CV, copies of relevant examinations, a research proposal (max. 5000 words), a writing sample (a chapter or essay), and the names and addresses of two referees. They should be sent electronically by 31 July 2016 to Prof. Dr. Ravi Ahuja.