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Welcome to the Toynbee Prize Foundation

The Foundation seeks to promote scholarly engagement with global history through several activities. Foremost among these is the Toynbee Prize, an award granted every other year to recognize outstanding work in global history. As an affiliated society of the American Historical Association, the Foundation sponsors one session at the Association’s annual meeting. In the years in which the Prize is awarded, the recipient presents a lecture. In alternate years, the Foundation sponsors a session on global history.

CFP: Cambridge World History Workshop (Fall 2019)

The Cambridge World History Workshop is inviting submissions to deliver papers during Michaelmas Term 2019 (October – December). The workshop welcomes contributions that give attention to global historical perspectives. We welcome, amongst others, presentations that focus on economic histories, histories of science, migration, race, gender, colonial and post-colonial studies, and comparative history. We encourage presenters…

Applications Open: Executive Director, Toynbee Prize Foundation

The Toynbee Prize Foundation is seeking to make an appointment of an Executive Director, to begin on September 15, 2019. The position is part-time (ca. 5 hours per week), and the current compensation is US$6000 per annum. In addition, the executive director has the chance to travel to Toynbee Prize Foundation events. While the foundation is located in Boston, Massachusetts, the executive director can be based anywhere in the world. The executive director will mainly communicate with other foundation members via email and teleconferences, and so strong communication skills in English in addition to one’s native language are a must.

What We’re Reading This Week

Martin Crevier Aaron Ackerly, “Old Prejudices, New Debates: J.A. Hobson and Anti-Semitism,” History Matters Damian Zane, “Why is a Tanzanian chief’s skull mentioned in the Versailles Treaty?,” BBC Christine Chevalier-Caron, “Algérie, une histoire de révolutions: discussions avec trois jeunes engagés,” Histoire engagées Natalie C. Behrends Audrey Farley, “We Still Don’t Know How to Navigate the…

What We’re Reading This Week

The front page of L’Humanité on November 1, 1956

Matthew Bowser

Alex Ward, “Aung San Suu Kyi Meets with Hungary’s Orbán to Lament their ‘Growing Muslim Populations’”, Vox

Vincent Bevins, “What the United States Did in Indonesia”, The Atlantic

Ajay Verghese, “Is India Becoming a ‘Hindu State’?”, The Washington Post

Sean O’Grady, “Just like the Suez Crisis, Brexit Humiliation is a Stark Reminder of Britain’s Waning Global Influence”, The Independent

Dexter Govan

Meehan Crist, “A Strange Blight“, London Review of Books 

Richard English, “If Brexit, rather than militant Irish republicanism, brings about end to partition, how will future view violence of the past?” Belfast Telegraph 

Rana Foroohar, “Plans for a worker-led economy straddle America’s political dividesThe Financial Times

Simon Vazquez, “Losing Barcelona“, Jacobin

Colin Bernard

Howard W. French, “Africa’s Lost Kingdoms“, NY Review

Sarah A. Seo, “How Cars Transformed Policing“, Boston Review

Kim Phillips-Fein, “Fear and Loathing of the Green New Deal“, The New Republic

Peter Svik, “Global Neo-Colonialism (Or on the Cold War and What Came After)“, LSE International History Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Image 2 of 3 for Nuevo Cocinero Mexicano en Forma de Diccionario
Nuevo Cocinero Mejicano, 1872 (Source: Pazzo Books)

Joseph Satish

Ehsan Masood, “How China is redrawing the map of world science” , Nature

Zoe Jackson, “ARPANET and the Development of the Internet, 50 Years Later”, Perspectives on History

Prerna Gupta & M V Ramana, “A Decade After the Nuclear Deal”The India Forum

Mark Kinver, “Compassionate conservation is ‘seriously flawed'”, BBC News

Sean Phillips

Damon Salesa, “Decolonising the Pacific”, E-Tangata 

Katharina Rietzler, “The Hotel Majestic and the Origins of Chatham House”Chatham House

Joshua Specht, “American Bull“, Aeon 

Mary Hui, “The generations are warring in Hong Kong over the memory of Tiananmen”, Quartz

Yehor Brailian

Keith Lowe, “Was 1945 the World’s Year Zero?”, History Extra

Alexander Lee, “Enchiladas, a Culinary Monument to Colonialism”, History Today

Onni Gust, “Radical Books: Trans Like Me (2017), CN Lester,” Historical Workshop

Nicholas Germana, “Hegel and the Sphinx: The Riddle of World History”, JHI Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Jean-Pascal Sébah, Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, 1890s (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

James Parker

Kapil Komireddi, “Five More Years of Narendra Modi Will Take India to a Dark Place,” The Guardian

Lauren MacIvor Thompson, “Abortion: The Archive Doesnt Lie, but Republicans Do“, Nursing Clio 

Elias Rodriques, “Building Another World: When the Black Panthers Came to Algeria,” The Nation 

Chloe Bordewich

Arafat Razzaque, “Who was the ‘real’ Aladdin? From Chinese to Arab in 300 Years,” Ajam Media Collective

Hala al-Bazri, “بدايات في ‘فرنجة التسطير’’: كيف واكب الشدياق انتقال الكتاب من النخبة إلى العامة,” Bidayat

Sam Haselby, “Muslims of Early America,” Aeon

Chris Szabla

Dexter Fergie, “The Department of Everything,” LA Review of Books 

Adam Shatz, “Orientalism Then and Now,” NYRB

Suzy Hansen, “Timeless Life of the Grand Bazaar,Lapham’s Quarterly

Thomas Wells, “Asshole Nationalism: Toward a New Theory of International Relations,ABC Religion and Ethics 
 

CFP: “(Forced) Migration and Large-Scale Settlement” (Dresden, April 2020)

As world politics continue to revolve around questions and controversies concerning refugees and migration, historians have begun to pay increasing attention to earlier forms of human movement that have been compelled or assisted by states or international organizations, which can offer valuable background and precedents. A conference to be held in Germany next year seeks…

Thinking Global in Turkey: An Interview with Trustee Selçuk Esenbel

Prof. Selçuk Esenbel is Emeritus Professor of Japanese and Asian History in the History Department of Bogazici University. She is also a Professor of History at 29 May University in Istanbul.

Looking at academic calls for papers and conference topics in recent years, there can be no doubt that global history is on the rise. However, despite calls to write “global history globally,” it is clear that global history has not risen in all countries simultaneously. Turkey, which has a long history of hosting many different civilizations has much potential for supporting work in global history. Although this potential is not yet reflected in academic studies relating to global history, international events such as the Global History Student Conference-Istanbul held recently in Istanbul Sehir University are an indicator that work in this field is accelerating.

Our most recent guest, Prof. Selçuk Esenbel is one of the trustees of the Toynbee Prize Foundation, and a leading historian in Turkey. Prof. Esenbel has contributed greatly to the development of global history in Turkey, specifically in relation to Japanese and wider Eurasian history. I got the chance to sit down with Esenbel in Istanbul to talk about the state of global history in Turkey today and her recent book, Japan on the Silk Road: Encounters and Perspectives of Politics and Culture in Eurasia (Brill’s Japanese Studies Library, 2017).

-Fatma Aladağ

What We’re Reading This Week

Madeleine Albright and Richard Holbrooke, 1996 (Source: AFP/Getty Images)

Liat Spiro

Yuliya Komska, “In Search of an Anti-Fascist Language,” Boston Review 

Jan-Werner Müller, “Populism and the People,” LRB

K-Sue Park, “Self-Deportation Nation,” Harvard Law Review 

Tiger Zhifu Li

Greg Lockhart, “What we forget on ANZAC Day,” Pearls and Irritations

Kirsty Needham and Matthew Knott, “White House Reviews Military Plans Against Iran, in Echoes of Iraq War,” NYT

Diver breaks record with deepest submarine voyage ever recorded, finds discarded plastic,” NZ Herald

Natalie C. Behrends

David A. Bell, “Daniel Bell at 100,” Dissent

John Schneider, “‘Working’: A Brief History of History,” LA Review of Books

George Packer, “The End of the American Century,” Atlantic Monthly