The Blog March 2, 2021

What We're Reading This Week

Credit: Vincent Van Gogh’s (1890) Treurende oude man at the Kröller-Müller Museum

 

Cindy Ewing

James Robins, “Can historians be traumatized by history?” The New Republic

Despite the analytical dispassion with which historians are supposed to work, the violence and pain that historians confront in their intimate knowledge of their research mirror struggles that societies confront in moments of trauma.

Jon Davidann, “The myth of westernization,” Aeon

The nineteenth-century Japanese intellectual Fukuzawa Yukichi located himself within the confluence of Western and Japanese cultures, not out of imitation as some scholars have asserted, but out of an anticolonial and nationalist preservation of identity.

Zaka Toto, “When Martinique cannibalized colonialism,” Public Books

As mayor of Fort-de-France in Martinique, Aimé Césaire remade and retranslated a colonial-era monument into a living site for celebrating Black culture and artistic production.

Brenda Gayle Plummer, “For generations, African Americans have led global antiracist movements,” The Washington Post

The current moment of anti-racist protest in the United States sits in a long and global history of opposition to racial domination and colonialism outside its borders.

 

Julia Klimova

Susie Linfield, “When genocide is caught on film,The New York Times

A book review of “The ravine: A family, a photograph, a holocaust massacre revealed” by Wendy Lower.

Jo Glanville, “A gift for Holocaust deniers’: How Polish libel ruling will hit historians,The Guardian

The authors of a two-volume history on the fate of Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland apologize to a woman for defaming her uncle. Jo Glanville explores its implications on the further study of the Holocaust.

Michele A. Berdy, “The language of UnFreedom from the Gulag,The Moscow Times

Michele Berdy reviews a new exhibition dedicated to a recently published dictionary of camp slang at the GULAG museum in Moscow.

Todd L. Pittinsky, “Hitler this, Hitler that,” The Times of Israel

Todd Pittinsky discusses problems with Holocaust analogies in current US politics.

Nelly Bekus, “Historical memory and symbolism in the Belarusian protests,” Cultures and History Forum

Nelly Bekus explores the politics of symbolism and cultural memory behind the current Belarusian protests.

 

Rustam Khan

Brian Hioe, “Who are the Chinese ‘left’ nationalists? This Chinese intellectual clique has demonstrated a strong interest in the work of Nazi thinkers, Lausan HK

An intellectual history of the rise of Chinese 'left nationalists' in Lausan HK.

Adam Shatz, “Dynamo current, feet, fists, salt,London Review of Books

London Review of Books on the history and memory of the Algerian war of liberation in France and abroad.

Jake Bittle, “Annals of annihilation: The climate crisis according to The New Yorker,The Baffler

The Baffler on the global representation of climate crisis.

This website is using cookies to provide a good browsing experience

These include essential cookies that are necessary for the operation of the site, as well as others that are used only for anonymous statistical purposes, for comfort settings or to display personalized content. You can decide for yourself which categories you want to allow. Please note that based on your settings, not all functions of the website may be available.

Privacy Policy Imprint
This website is using cookies to provide a good browsing experience

These include essential cookies that are necessary for the operation of the site, as well as others that are used only for anonymous statistical purposes, for comfort settings or to display personalized content. You can decide for yourself which categories you want to allow. Please note that based on your settings, not all functions of the website may be available.

Privacy Policy Imprint
Your cookie preferences have been saved.