Category: The Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Colin Bernard Wolfgang Streeck, “Progressive Regression” , The New Left Review Ian Johnson, “The Eastern Jesus”, The New York Review of Books Adom Getachew, “Holding Ourselves Responsible”, The Boston Review  Rafael Rojas, “El 68 mexicano: la nueva historia”, Letras Libres Dexter Govan Breda O’Brien, “UCD to turn on canonisation of John Henry Newman,” The Irish Times  Rhian E. Jones, “Remembering…

Applications open: Editors-at-Large

We welcome applications for the position of Editor-at-Large from graduate students and advanced undergraduates. We are especially interested in students working on or located in the Global South and in the early modern and pre-modern periods. The Toynbee Prize Foundation’s Global History Blog features a mix of long-form (interviews with global historians, roundtables on new books, conference…

Toynbee Prize Foundation names Dr. Nicole CuUnjieng Aboitiz as new Executive Director

Dr. Nicole CuUnjieng Aboitiz

The Toynbee Prize Foundation (TPF) is excited to announce the appointment of Dr. Nicole CuUnjieng Aboitiz as the new Executive Director.

Originally from the Philippines, Dr. CuUnjieng Aboitiz is currently a Research Fellow at Clare Hall, University of Cambridge. She holds a Ph.D. with Distinction in Southeast Asian and International History from Yale University, and was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. Her first book, Asian Place, Filipino Nation: A Global Intellectual History of the Philippine Revolution, 1887-1912 is due to be published in spring 2020 with Columbia University Press. It charts the emplotment of ‘place’ in the proto-national thought and Pan-Asian revolutionary organizing of turn-of-the-twentieth-century Filipino thinkers, and how their constructions of ‘Asia’ and Malayness connected them to their regional neighbors undertaking the same work.

In becoming Executive Director of the TPF, Dr. CuUnjieng Aboitiz said that she aims “to expand intellectual history beyond the West and to intersect social and cultural history with intellectual history such that the latter is presented as lived experience, not merely abstracted discourse.” 

Dr. CuUnjieng Aboitiz replaces Aden Knaap as Executive Director, who has held the position since 2017. Knaap, who is currently a Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University, is taking up an International Dissertation Research Fellowship from the Social Science Research Council. 

The Toynbee Prize Foundation was founded in 1987. It awards the Toynbee Prize, which is granted every other year to recognize outstanding work in global history.

CFP: Cambridge World History Workshop (Fall 2019)

The Cambridge World History Workshop is inviting submissions to deliver papers during Michaelmas Term 2019 (October – December). The workshop welcomes contributions that give attention to global historical perspectives. We welcome, amongst others, presentations that focus on economic histories, histories of science, migration, race, gender, colonial and post-colonial studies, and comparative history. We encourage presenters…

Applications Open: Executive Director, Toynbee Prize Foundation

The Toynbee Prize Foundation is seeking to make an appointment of an Executive Director, to begin on September 15, 2019. The position is part-time (ca. 5 hours per week), and the current compensation is US$6000 per annum. In addition, the executive director has the chance to travel to Toynbee Prize Foundation events. While the foundation is located in Boston, Massachusetts, the executive director can be based anywhere in the world. The executive director will mainly communicate with other foundation members via email and teleconferences, and so strong communication skills in English in addition to one’s native language are a must.

What We’re Reading This Week

Martin Crevier Aaron Ackerly, “Old Prejudices, New Debates: J.A. Hobson and Anti-Semitism,” History Matters Damian Zane, “Why is a Tanzanian chief’s skull mentioned in the Versailles Treaty?,” BBC Christine Chevalier-Caron, “Algérie, une histoire de révolutions: discussions avec trois jeunes engagés,” Histoire engagées Natalie C. Behrends Audrey Farley, “We Still Don’t Know How to Navigate the…

What We’re Reading This Week

The front page of L’Humanité on November 1, 1956

Matthew Bowser

Alex Ward, “Aung San Suu Kyi Meets with Hungary’s Orbán to Lament their ‘Growing Muslim Populations’”, Vox

Vincent Bevins, “What the United States Did in Indonesia”, The Atlantic

Ajay Verghese, “Is India Becoming a ‘Hindu State’?”, The Washington Post

Sean O’Grady, “Just like the Suez Crisis, Brexit Humiliation is a Stark Reminder of Britain’s Waning Global Influence”, The Independent

Dexter Govan

Meehan Crist, “A Strange Blight“, London Review of Books 

Richard English, “If Brexit, rather than militant Irish republicanism, brings about end to partition, how will future view violence of the past?” Belfast Telegraph 

Rana Foroohar, “Plans for a worker-led economy straddle America’s political dividesThe Financial Times

Simon Vazquez, “Losing Barcelona“, Jacobin

Colin Bernard

Howard W. French, “Africa’s Lost Kingdoms“, NY Review

Sarah A. Seo, “How Cars Transformed Policing“, Boston Review

Kim Phillips-Fein, “Fear and Loathing of the Green New Deal“, The New Republic

Peter Svik, “Global Neo-Colonialism (Or on the Cold War and What Came After)“, LSE International History Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Image 2 of 3 for Nuevo Cocinero Mexicano en Forma de Diccionario
Nuevo Cocinero Mejicano, 1872 (Source: Pazzo Books)

Joseph Satish

Ehsan Masood, “How China is redrawing the map of world science” , Nature

Zoe Jackson, “ARPANET and the Development of the Internet, 50 Years Later”, Perspectives on History

Prerna Gupta & M V Ramana, “A Decade After the Nuclear Deal”The India Forum

Mark Kinver, “Compassionate conservation is ‘seriously flawed'”, BBC News

Sean Phillips

Damon Salesa, “Decolonising the Pacific”, E-Tangata 

Katharina Rietzler, “The Hotel Majestic and the Origins of Chatham House”Chatham House

Joshua Specht, “American Bull“, Aeon 

Mary Hui, “The generations are warring in Hong Kong over the memory of Tiananmen”, Quartz

Yehor Brailian

Keith Lowe, “Was 1945 the World’s Year Zero?”, History Extra

Alexander Lee, “Enchiladas, a Culinary Monument to Colonialism”, History Today

Onni Gust, “Radical Books: Trans Like Me (2017), CN Lester,” Historical Workshop

Nicholas Germana, “Hegel and the Sphinx: The Riddle of World History”, JHI Blog

What We’re Reading This Week

Jean-Pascal Sébah, Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, 1890s (Source: Wikipedia Commons)

James Parker

Kapil Komireddi, “Five More Years of Narendra Modi Will Take India to a Dark Place,” The Guardian

Lauren MacIvor Thompson, “Abortion: The Archive Doesnt Lie, but Republicans Do“, Nursing Clio 

Elias Rodriques, “Building Another World: When the Black Panthers Came to Algeria,” The Nation 

Chloe Bordewich

Arafat Razzaque, “Who was the ‘real’ Aladdin? From Chinese to Arab in 300 Years,” Ajam Media Collective

Hala al-Bazri, “بدايات في ‘فرنجة التسطير’’: كيف واكب الشدياق انتقال الكتاب من النخبة إلى العامة,” Bidayat

Sam Haselby, “Muslims of Early America,” Aeon

Chris Szabla

Dexter Fergie, “The Department of Everything,” LA Review of Books 

Adam Shatz, “Orientalism Then and Now,” NYRB

Suzy Hansen, “Timeless Life of the Grand Bazaar,Lapham’s Quarterly

Thomas Wells, “Asshole Nationalism: Toward a New Theory of International Relations,ABC Religion and Ethics