Latin American histories

Featured Interviews

A More Expansive Atlantic History of the Americas: An Interview with Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra
Interviews | August 12, 2021

A More Expansive Atlantic History of the Americas: An Interview with Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra

Jorge Cañizares Esguerra details his current project, Radical Spanish Empire. His aim is to historicize, to radicalize, to Americanize (expansively understood), and to show that colonial Massachusetts is unintelligible without Puebla or Tlaxcala in colonial Mexico, that colonial Virginia makes no sense without its Andean and Peruvian counterparts, and that Calvinists should be understood alongside Franciscans.

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On Global History: Avatars, Dilemmas, Partitions, Problems—A Conversation with Jeremy Adelman
Interviews | January 13, 2021

On Global History: Avatars, Dilemmas, Partitions, Problems—A Conversation with Jeremy Adelman

This conversation with Toynbee Prize Foundation Trustee Jeremy Adelman took place during the global COVID-19 pandemic, the final weeks of the US Presidential election, and the end of the Brexit negotiations. Through the lens of global history, we discussed tense relations amid the most recent wave of globalization and our present moment of resurgent nationalisms.

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Populism in History: An Interview with Federico Finchelstein
Interviews | July 24, 2018

Populism in History: An Interview with Federico Finchelstein

In his book, From Fascism to Populism in History (University of California Press, 2017) Federico Finchelstein provides the reader with an understanding of many of the most important theories of populism and how these theories stack up in the face of the 'messiness' of the global historical record. This hybrid intellectual-political history demonstrates how fascism and populism are connected but not the same, and why this matters for understanding the world today. In doing so, Finchelstein shows why we cannot afford not to have historians engage in contemporary political conversations.

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Writing Global Ecological History 'From Below': An Interview with Gregory Cushman
Interviews | January 31, 2018

Writing Global Ecological History 'From Below': An Interview with Gregory Cushman

To further our understanding of the development of industrial capitalism over the past two centuries Greg Cushman claims, we need to write histories 'from below,' in two senses: first, we need to write histories that consider not just those who 'invented the steam engine', but those which trace the origins of the steam engine's parts (material and intellectual) wherever across the globe that leads us – often far beyond the 'Global North'. Second, we need to investigate our planetary history below the earth's surface. Lithospheric history Cushman calls it.

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Featured Articles

Roundtable—In the Land of Forgetfulness: History, Memory, and Culture in Disney’s Encanto
Article | March 30, 2022

Roundtable—In the Land of Forgetfulness: History, Memory, and Culture in Disney’s Encanto

The Disney film Encanto aspires to provide a new visual and acoustic vocabulary of what it means to be Colombian for moviegoers in this country, Latin America, and beyond. As such, it offers a promising entry point into a more sustained scholarly inquiry into questions of representation, memory, and culture in global history. Of course, the movie does not aspire to offer a “truthful” representation of Colombia’s troubled historyin fact, its ambiguous chronology and geography show that the Encanto’s Colombia is as much imagined as it is real. But, at the same, how the film curates and packages certain elements of Colombia’s past for global audiences provides much food for thought. In its narrative, some saw a wider metaphor about the state of Unitedstatesean fragmentary politics; others saw a call for the reimagination of “romantic love,” a meditation on the “crushing weight of tradition,” or a commodified and whitewashed “Disneyfication” of Latin American cultures that caters to the growing market share of Hispanic-Unitedstateseans. We convened a roundtable with three Colombian(ist) scholars to tackle these and many other questions.

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Review—In a Sea of Empires: Networks and Crossings in the Revolutionary Caribbean
Article | January 10, 2022

Review—In a Sea of Empires: Networks and Crossings in the Revolutionary Caribbean

Jeppe Mulich’s In a Sea of Empires addresses how to bridge the local and the global, an issue central to global history since its birth as a subfield. The author rests his approach upon a bold claim: interimperial microregions are crucibles of early globalization. To prove how the microregion “provides an analytical ideal-type that is pertinent to a variety of historical contexts,” Mulich advances his thesis on two levels, one theoretical and the other historical. To start, he constructs a framework for interpreting microregions from a set of thematic categories ranging from the political to the geographical. Putting this concept into practice, Mulich focuses on the Leeward Islands, a Caribbean archipelago, from 1783 to 1834. In doing so, Mulich brilliantly demonstrates the Leeward Islands’ historical importance and provides a typology for microregions on a global scale.

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Featured Blog Posts

Doing Global History: Research Field Guide to the Archivo General de la Nación (Mexico)
The Blog | February 26, 2020

Doing Global History: Research Field Guide to the Archivo General de la Nación (Mexico)

When you approach the Archivo General de la Nación (AGN) in Mexico City, Mexico, you notice large dark fences, big walls, and intriguing architecture. You typically enter through a massive gate, secured by an armed police officer, near the complex's parking lot. The guards and AGN's structural qualities convey a sense of protection and control. One could easily think that this design is to keep documents safely inside. While that is presently true, the original design was to keep people inside.

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Featured Reading Lists

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